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Full text of "Sou'wester Yearbook"

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SOU'WESTER 

of 

1950 





> 


2 


In Memoriam 


3 


Dedication 


4 


Our Campus 


15 


Administration and Faculty 


31 


Seniors 


55 


Juniors 


65 


Sophomores 


79 


Freshmen 


91 


Social Organizations 


113 


Campus Organizations 


141 


Sports 


157 


Beauties 


173 


Campus Life 


185 


Advertisements 



PARKER FOLSE, JR. 
Editor 



MARLEE BAKER 
Associate Editor 




2p- 



((A, 



SERVANT OF GOD 




M 



e m o r \ a m 



It is extremely difficult for a vision or a dream to become a reality 
and such a thing seldom ever happens. Therefore, the "Sou-ivest'er" 
here takes the opportunity to pay tribute respectfully to a man who 
lived, worked, and died that Iris dream of a greater Southwestern might 
become a reality. 

Dr. }. N. R. Score was a man of vision, a man of high ideals, a man 
of God, and a man whose life was devoted to the best interests of his 
fellow man. Throughout his eight years on this campus, Dr. Score 
worked to make Southwestern a university of which all Methodism 
could be proud and succeeding years will prove his work ivas not in 
vain. 

Mere words cannot memorialize the efforts and effects of this man 
on our university. However, the buildings which will be erected will 
stand forever as a fitting tribute and the young men and women who 
are receiving and will receive their education in these halls of learning 
will go out into the world as living memorials to the success of a man 
who had the determination and courage to make his dreams come 
true-Dr. J. N. R. Score 



DEDICATION 



To 



The memory of Dr. Score, who 
worked unceasingly to make 
Southwestern better, 

Mr. and Mrs. Perkins for their 
strengthening of Christian 
life at Southwestern through 
the giving of Lois Perkins 
Chapel, 

The Board of Trustees for their 
interest and supervision. 

The Administration for its sym- 
pathy to our problems. 

The Faculty for giving of 

priceless knowledge, advice, 
and associations. 

The people of Georgetown for 
their hospitality and coopera- 
tion. 

Our parents for giving us this 
education. 

The matrons and everyone on the 
campus who have given of their 
time and efforts, their love 
and spirit and friendship 
toward making 1949 and 1950 
the best year for Southwestern. 




will write the 



dedication in future years. 



OUR CAMPUS 
of 

SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



On the wide-lawned campus here at Southwestern is enacted 
a drama" of youth: of carefree hours spent among friends, of 
fruitful hours spent in satisfying study, of heartaches, of joys. 
Here is a pattern for living. 

When one recalls Southwestern he remembers many things — 
things which touch the heartstrings and bring forth the reminis- 
cent music of happy moments plucked from cadenzas of serious 
thought, bouyant friendships, poignant griefs, ever-widening 
horizons, peace, and restful security. Southwestern is more 
than all of these, more than the buildings, more than the people 
— it is a tradition, and an ideal. 

If only the shady walks might tell the secrets which their 
sympathetic ears have heard; if only the buildings might share 
the whispered dreams, and the confidence which comes with 
knowledge. The years will never erase these memories, for they 
are as indelible as time: 

Moonlight over the Ad Building etching in gentle 

relief the stone towers and ivy-covered walls that have seen 

generation upon generation pass by in search of a future 

the Student Union and the disappointed faces after selling a 
book back, the easy rhythm of the tinkling upright piano, the 

fast and furious ping-pong games Mood Hall, — yes, 

good old Mood Hall, with its balconies and skylight, its familiar 
views from the west windows of the tracks and the watertower, 

the boys, the controlling hand of Mrs. Cornwell the 

infirmary, the restless patients anxious to be up — to be with the 
friends who come to the windows and talk because they are not 

allowed in as visitors the thrill of a football game at 

Snyder Field, the crowd, the yells, the antics at half time, the 
colorful floats across the field at Homecoming, the proud feeling 

when the Pirates emerge from the fieldhouse the 

Art Shop, with trumpet sounds coming from the band room, and 
clay modeling and figure drawing going on in the art department, 
the "No Admittance" print shop with its myriad equipment 

Skinney's Tavern, where good friends get together, 

the scene of conversation over coffee cups, elation and dejection 
at the mailboxes, the clink of nickels on the pinball machines 
and "I've got the next one!", the innumerable posters on election 



day the Angels of Barracks A (not always so angelic) 

who think it is their job to keep the dog kingdom well populated 

the old Science Building, decrepit but still there, still 

keeping students up until all hours with Bunsen burners and 

test tubes searching for unknowns the Science Facility, 

with its dogfish and dogged Biology students the com- 
bination of sounds coming from the Fine Arts Building: an 
orchestra, band, chorus, fifteen pianists and an organist all 
tuning up at the same time Rendezvous at the library 

with love as the general heading the exciting varsity 

basketball and girls' intramural volleyball games in the gym, 

the P. E. classes, and the tap dancers finally, L. K. 

Hall, the midnight gab sessions and cheese and cracker parties 
(chili, before the hotplates were confiscated), the dining hall, 
the annex and chapter rooms, the immaculate cleaning when 
visitors are expected, the traffic jam on Saturday nights, the 
farewells on the front porch 

On this our campus is built an institution; on this campus is 
built a hope — to give each student, outside the realm of 
degrees and teachers' certificates, an intangible guidepost for 
the future. 




4 






5 





In this building lies the heart and 
pulse of the school from which the 
students draw their resources — not 
meaning in this case the monetary 
resources which can be found in 
the business office. The administra- 
tive offices found here create the 
basis of our education and here we 
find not only the professors, the 
walls and blackboards, but that bit 
of knowledge which sparks our lives 
to growth in a Society— one of which 
we are becoming a part. 



building 



Each of us has had his own 
separate experiences which will 
never be forgotten, whether it be 
time spent standing in registration 
lines, the stroll in the hall to the 
coke machine, or those few anxious 
moments spent outside the Deans' 
offices. To some it is a building which 
must be left, seldom to be entered 
again, but to others it is the symbol 
of what is to be received in their 
next few years here. In either case, 
it is the building that is never to be 
forgotten from that first view from 
the distant hill along the highway. 










■ ■'- .■ ,* ■ 














Longfellow once said, "The student has his Rome, 
his Florence, his whole glowing Italy within 
the four walls of his library." 
Surely he couldn't have been 
referring to a university library such as 
Cody Memorial, for 
students here find much more 
than Rome and Florence— Ah, yes! 
Those eight o'clock dates, of course. Some say 
the silence of this library is hampered 
only by the bright lights. Yet, not to be 
forgotten are those many hours 
spent here for searching and researching 
for those little gems, the 
thought twisters, our profs so aptly call themes. 



library U a 



lu/icu/r Lowi /ngceMibu. 




S 





LAURA KUYKENDALL 




This building is more than a dormitory 
to all the girls who live here during the 
school year. In here friendships are 
made that will last throughout life; 
memories are made that will last for- 
ever. Under the supervision of Mrs. 
Smith, Mrs. Williams, and Mrs. Bridges 
all the girls, at one time or another, 
have a longing to climb down one of 
the fire escapes or go through the front 
lobby in blue jeans. But this comes 
only to the senior girls on one certain 
day. 

This building is visited by many, many 
boys here daily (and nightly) to gaze 
into the charming eyes of all those girls! 
If anyone is the envy of all the males 
on the campus it is certainly Doc, for 
he alone can pass through those halls 
without receiving demerits. 
Kuykendall Hall is certainly the pride 
of the campus with its green spacious 
lawns and its beautifully scented rose 
bushes and, we must add, those softly 
illuminated evenings beneath the spot- 
lights. 




Matrons Smith, Williams, and 
Bridges probably discussing the 
outcome of the evening Canasta 
game. 



MOOD HALL 

MEN'S DORMITORY 



Probably no other person on the campus is more prominent 
than Mrs. Margaret Cornwell, supervisor of Mood Hall. 
When a boy first comes to Southwestern the person that 
he first meets is Mrs. Cornwell, the beginning of his first 
campus friendship. To many of the boys she has been a 
mother away from home and has helped each one in some 
way or another. No person is more generous or lenient, 
and no one is more willing to help. 



Probably more things have happened in this dorm than 
in any other building here, with activities ranging from 
studies, pep rallies, serenades, to pillow fights and track 
meets on the third floor and baseball games on the second. 
At least once the girls had an opportunity to come get the 
boys for dates here. No matter how long a boy stays 
here the time will never be forgotten. 



Mrs. Cornwell as seen daily at her 
office desk. 






Mrs. Score, above, expertly breaks 
ground at Lois Perkins Chapel cere- 
monies. 

Below, the framework for the chapel 
etches a geometrical pattern against the 
sky. 



LOIS PERKINS CHAPEL 



The most long-awaited event in recent Southwestern history — the 
building of our Chapel. The groundbreaking ceremonies were held on 
the spot where the altar is to stand, during one of the first regular 
chapel services at the first of the year. First to break the ground 
was Mrs. Score, wife of the late Dr. J. N. R. Score, former president of 
Southwestern; school officials then wielded the spade, then presidents 
of all the campus organizations. 

Each day students have watched it grow and mature into a graceful, 
stately building, one which may be seen and admired upon entering 
Georgetown from the hills, and one which will become an integral 
part of our school and Christian life. It is not yet completed, but will 
be when the seniors of 1951 are ready to walk down its aisles. 




Left: Quite a lofty position! atop the tower of Lois Perkins Chapel. 

Right: The Chapel under construction makes an interesting picture, 
and gives a promise of what is to be. 



10 



JIM WEST 
GYMNASIUM 



At night the glow of the lights 
streaming through the spacious 
windows combined with the swells 
of yells resounding from within give 
life to the spirit and enthusiasm of 
the game of basketball. Not only 
basketball, but scores of games, 
boxing, volleyball, and all sorts of 
gymnastic feats keep the health and 
spirit of education on an even keel. 
There are no "dull Jacks" here. 




THE SCIENCE BUILDING 




Condemned! 
That is the fate of this 
fading building. To some eyes 
this will be 

a sad occasion, but oh, to the many 
never will there be a more 
glorifying sight. 

It is true that this building has 

served many— and well, but 

as time passes the old must give 

way to the new. 

Short lived? Yes. But who will 

ever forget those tedious 

hours spent 

over a Bunsen burner, running unknown 
after unknown through 
its paces to please those faces 
of Dr. Godbey and Dr. Wannfried while 
others still labored through 
their physics problems. 
And, if English never was a science, 
it is now, as Mrs. Geppert can 
well assure. But still- 
Condemned! 



11 




Another view of the Ad building and 
Mood Hall. 




12 





Marilyn Dusek expresses 
sheer rapture at the taste 
of one of the Tavern's 

"exquisite" hamburgers. 



"MAIL CALL' 




"Duh, who, me!" — 
Joiner, in upper right 
picture. 

Push dat ball, lift dat 
machine, get a little 
rough and you land in^ 
"Tilt! 




WILLIAM CARRINGTON FINCH 



A.B., S.T.B., Th.M., Ph.D. 
ACTING PRESIDENT 



f 



Dr. Finch was named Acting President of the 
University upon the death of Dr. Score. He is 
doing a remarkable job and has become a 
friend to every student. 



I. J. McCOOK, D.C.S. 

BUSINESS MANAGER 



M. HOWARD KNOX 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 




18 





HENRY EDWIN MEYER 

A.B., B.S., B.M., A.M., MUS.D. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS. 



THE ADMINISTRATION 



Southwestern University is an insti- 
tution of the Methodist Church. It 
is governed by a Board of Trustees 
composed of twenty-five members, 
both ministers and laymen. These 
men are selected from the Texas 
Conferences as well as the New 
Mexico Conference. These members 
are elected by the Annual Con- 
ferences and have a term of office 
for four years. This board operates 
under the charter which was ap- 
proved February 5, 1875. Since that 



time, however, there have been 
several revisions. 

For more than a hundred years 
now, since its origin as Ruterville 
College in February, 1840, South- 
western has had as its ideal the 
development of Christian culture 
and character. The administration, 
as well as the faculty and every 
member connected with the Univer- 
sity, adds its part to this goal of de- 
veloping better men and women. 



19 




20 




21 



SOCIAL SCIENCES, RELIGION 
AND BIBLE 

In these departments the classes are taught with 
the idea in mind of improving the students' general 
culture, to prepare them for citizenship, and to help 
them to understand the Bible and to prepare for the 
Christian way of life. 




JOHN V. BERGLUND 
ASSO. PROFESSOR OF RE- 
LIGION AND CHURCH 
HISTORY 




Dr. Gaupp lecturing to one of his classes in History. 



GEORGE C. HESTER 

PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF 
THE DEFT. OF HISTORY AND 
GOVERNMENT, CHAIRMAN 
OF THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL 
SCIENCES 



FRANK E. LUKSA 

ASSO. PROFESSOR AND HEAD 
OF THE DEPT. OF SOCIOLOGY 





CARL W. BERGQUIST 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
HISTORY 





FREDERICK GAUPP 

ACTING ASSO. PROFESSOR 
OF HISTORY AND GOVERN- 
MENT 

LUTHER J. WAGGONER 

ASSO. PROFESSOR OF HIS- 
TORY AND CHURCH HISTORY 





BENJAMIN F. JACKSON, JR. 
ASSO. PROFESSOR AND 
HEAD OF THE DEPT. OF RE- 
LIGIOUS EDUCATION 



EDMUND H. STEELMAN ' 
ASSO. PROFESSOR AND ACT- 
ING HEAD OF THE BISHOP 
SETH WARD CHAIR OF BIBLE 



HARVEY D. WATTS 
ASSO. PROFESSOR AND ACT- 
ING HEAD OF THE DEPT. OF 
■ RELIGION 



W. H. BURTON 
ASSO. PROFESSOR AND ACT- 
ING HEAD OF THE DEPT. OF 
EDUCATION 





EUNICE CLAIR GEPPART 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
ENGLISH 



RUTH MORGAN 
FERGUSON 

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH 



MARY ELIZABETH FOX 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
JOURNALISM 



CLAUD HOWARD 
PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF 
THE DEPT. OF ENGLISH AND 
JOURNALISM; CHAIRMAN OF 
THE DIVISION OF 
HUMANITIES 



EDUCATION, ENGLISH, AND 
PSYCHOLOGY 

These courses of study which some are pursuing are of a 
rather broad nature, being somewhat tedious in respects. 
Some prepare one for the teaching profession whereas the 
others are of a required nature. The English courses begin 
with the entrance exams, with the next step on the ladder 
to the degree being "0" English. Not to be forgotten is 
the Department of Journalism, which is the background for 
all of the school publications. 



Seen below is the happy classroom of Dr. Howard. Judging 
from the expressions on the faces of the enlightened weak- 
enders, he is probably discussing Shelley's Trannscezd-, 
Trendendsantalis--, the Byronic hero, no doubt! 



ETHEL MAE TAYLOR 
INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH 
AND EDUCATION 



OSCAR A. ULLRICH 

PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF 
THE DEPT. OF PSYCHOLOGY; 
DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 





HraHSL 




Professor Williams checks the Ledger as White, 
Monkhouse, Dyche, Burns and Traylor look on. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 

This is one of the busiest departments in the 
school, preparing men and women for office 
training and business practices for the world 
tomorrow. 




PAUL GRADY 
ANDERSON 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION AND ECONOM- 
ICS; DIRECTOR OF 
ADMISSIONS 



IRENE DEUPREE 
ASSO. PROFESSOR AND 
ACTING HEAD OF THE 
DEPT. OF HOME ECO- 
NOMICS 



DOROTHY ANN HAHN 
PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR 
IN HOME ECONOMICS 





ELIZABETH LUNDBLAD 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION AND ECO- 
NOMICS 



ABRAM MILLAR 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION AND ECO- 
NOMICS 



M. L. WILLIAMS 
PROFESSOR AND HEAD 
OF THE DEPT. OF BUSI- 
NESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND ECONOMICS 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Under the leadership of these 
coaches and teachers the stu- 
dents receive their physical 
training as well as prepara- 
tion toward becoming better 
sports in the group in which 
they are associated. 




Southwestern carries the ball in the annual homecoming game. 



THEODORE BARE 

INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICAL 
TRAINING AND TRACK 
COACH 



Not pictured is Spot Collins, 
Head Coach and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education. 




ROSEMARY GALYEN 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




RANDOLPH M. MEDLEY WILLIAM O. POTTENGER 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS; ASSO. ASSISTANT COACH; INSTRUCTOR 

PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF THE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

DEPT. OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND TRAINING 





CONSTANTIN N. APSOURI 

ACTING ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR AND ACTING HEAD OF THE 
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY 
AND MINERALOGY 



ABRAHAM P. FRIESEN 
PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYS- 
ICS AND AERONAUTICS 



JOHN CAMPBELL GODBEY 

PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEM- 
ISTRY; CHAIRMAN OF THE 
DIVISION OF NATURAL AND 
APPLIED SCIENCES 




HOWARD CARROLL 
SIVELLS 

ACTING ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR AND ACTING HEAD 
OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
BIOLOGY 



RALPH MARTIN 
WHITMORE 

ACTING ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR AND ACTING HEAD 
OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
MATHEMATICS AND GEN- 
ERAL ENGINEERING 



MARY ELIZABETH WILCOX 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AND 
ACTING HEAD OF THE DE- 
PARTMENT OF ASTRONOMY 
AND METEOROLOGY 





GEORGE WANNFRIED 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
CHEMISTRY 



Not pictured: 

COLOMAN DE CSERNA 

ACTING ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF BIOLOGY 



SCIENCES 

Students of science may groan 
about the long lab hours and girls 
may be a bit squeamish about dis- 
secting dogfish, frogs, and the like; 
but when they have finished the 
varied courses, they will have a 
wide knowledge of the physical 
world and its properties. 

Classes have met this year in the 
science building and temporary 
science facility, where there are 
many different cultures — bacteria, 
that is. 

A science degree is the first step to medical school, the cherished goal 
of so many hundreds of young pre-med students today. Larger schools 
may offer a more direct path, but here at Southwestern the student, 
through hard work, as at a larger school, may also attain his goal and 
at the same time may have the privilege of close companionship and 
security that only a small school can give. 

These professors offer their knowledge and experience in the hope that 
their students may advance in their particular fields to an even greater 
knowledge than the professors themselves embrace — which, after 
all, is the dream of every educator. And, we would venture to sav 
that, like Dr. Godbev, thev are "waiting for the new science building." 




FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



While all that some students learn to say in 
a foreign language is "Parlez-vous Fran- 
cais?" or "Chevrolet Coupe" or "Du bist 
an Schtinkatz," the students of these teach- 
ers learn the rudiments of their particular 
chosen language, gain a knowledge of the 
country and its customs, and acquire 
through the study of another culture a 
wider understanding and a deeper appre- 
ciation of their own mode of living and 
speaking. 

A large variety of courses is offered in each 
of these languages: Chinese, French, Ger- 
man, Greek ( Classic ) , Greek ( New Testa- 
ment) , Japanese, Latin, Russian, and Span- 
ish. There are ample opportunities to 
major in any of these languages, and spe- 
cial linguistic courses are offered for 
foreign language majors. 

Each of the instructors has studied or trav- 
eled in another country, thus bringing 
more directly to bear upon his classes the 
influence of another land. Miss Dauer 
studied at Elberfield, Germany, and Paris, 
France, and Dr. Patterson visited exten- 
sively in France. 

Dr. Frederick Lenz did a great part of 
his work at Berlin, while Dr. Mali Lenz 
studied in Lausanne, Switzerland, Berlin, 
Marburg, and Hamburg, Germany. 

Although Mr. McCoy has not studied in 
Mexico, he has absorbed so much atmos- 
phere from our neighbor because of fre- 
quent visits that one would suspect he had 
lived there all his life. 

In the manner of travelogues we would 
say, "As the sun sinks slowly in the west, 
we bid farewell to the pagodas of China, 
the tall Eiffel spires of France, the watch- 
towers of Germany, the stately Doric col- 
umns of Greece, the mirrored bridges of 
Japan, St. Peter's square in Rome, the 
Kremlin in Moscow, and the soft stucco 
palaces of Spain and Mexico." 

And in the time-honored phrase of so many 
romantic procrastinators, we shall say, 
"Manana!" 





DOROTHEA W. DAUER 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



FREDERICK W. LENZ 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



MALI G. LENZ 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



J. HAMILTON McCOY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



WILLIAM MORRISON 
PATTERSON 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 







L 








ART DEPARTMENT 



JAMES FLOYD VALONE, JR. 



ACTING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND 
ACTING HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT 
OF ART 



i 



iL. 



Mr. Valone gives suggestions in drawing from a model. 




CARL O. BERGOUIST 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF ART 



Mr. Bergquist shows his design students a thing or two. 




27 




IOLA BOWDEN 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
PIANO AND THEORY 



JACK LEDYARD COMAN 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
PIANO AND MUSIC EDUCA- 
TION 



THOMAS DOUGLASS 

ACTING ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR AND ACTING HEAD OF 
THE DEPT. OF STRINGS 




MUSIC 



RALPH W. JONES 
DIRECTOR OF THE BAND AND ORCHESTRA; AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR AND ACTING HEAD OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF WOODWIND, BRASS, 
AND PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS 



What can give so much joy to the 
aching human heart as music? 

The fine arts students must find 
satisfaction for their souls to spend 
so much time on their work. And 
surely the reward is great for all 
music students to achieve their ut- 
most accomplishment in their chos- 
en field, whether it be in piano, 
organ, voice, or brass and wind in- 
struments. 

The student body is fortunate also, 
in that they may enjoy the fruits 
of the labor that goes on unendingly 
in the long white frame building 
near the president's house. 



Mr. Comctn instructs a music his- 
tory class in the nomenclature of 
ancient instruments. 



SPEECH AND DRAMA 

The Department of Speech and Drama has grown considerably under 
the able direction of Mr. Springer. This past year several outstanding 
plays have been given and the speech team, headed by Mr. Raines, 
has brought home several trophies. 





54. JL 





HENRY EDWIN MEYER WENDELL L. OSBORN 
DEAN; PROFESSOR AND HEAD ACTING ASSOCIATE PRO- 
OF THE DEPARTMENT OF FESSOR AND ACTING HEAD 
PIANO AND ORGAN OF THE DEPT. OF VOICE 




HARRY A. PUTT 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
BRASS AND VOICE 



JOHN D. RICHARDS 

PROFESSOR AND HEAD OF 
THE DEPARTMENT OF MU- 
SIC EDUCATION; DIRECTOR 
OF SOUTHWESTERN UNI- 
VERSITY CHORUSES 





SAM RAINES 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
SPEECH AND DRAMA 



ROLAND ANGUS SPRINGER 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND 
HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
SPEECH AND DRAMA 



28 



Mr. Springer issuing one of his interesting lectures. 



MRS. GAUPP 

BINDERY DEPARTMENT 



MRS. INA BELL McLENDON 

UNIVERSITY NURSE 



MRS. BIERSCHALE 
LIBRARIAN 



mm 





Dr. Finch stretches for a long 
one in faculty volley ball game. 




Ugh! And over! 




Ball is in upper center; 
light spot near center of 
picture is Prof. Osborne's 
head. 



d ruination 




Pictured above are Prexy John 
Foster and Vice-President Parker 
Folse deep in consideration of South- 
western Magazine. 

At right is D. A. Brown, Secretary. 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



This, the senior class of '50, has had a long and varied 
history, beginning as far back as 1946 when veterans started 
as freshmen. It picked up some members in '47 and even 
some stragglers from '45. This has been an eventful year 
for the seniors; many things have been accomplished, and 
those never-to-be-forgotten memories have already begun 
to find a place in their hearts. 

The senior take-off was the highlight of their year's activi- 
ties — something many of them had waited for and plotted 
for. for a long time. But it certainly set a precedent, and suc- 
ceeding classes will no doubt try to equal it. 

Many outstanding seniors have 
taken their places in the Southwest- 
ern Halls of Fame. Senior recitals 
have been given, senior art shows, 
oral finals have been passed, and 
many have made a name for them- 
selves in friendliness and in good- 
ness on this campus. 

Now they will go out into the world 
to find their security and happiness, 
the background for which they found 
here at Southwestern. May good 
luck precede them, and God be with 
them, and may they always hail 
their Alma Mater. 



On the following pages are graduates of 1950, the largest 
class in Southwestern's history, (and the best!) 




ARMSTRONG, JACK 
Chicago, 111. 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 



Louis Armstrong 



ARMSTRONG, LOUIS 

Chicago, 111. 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business 



AVANT, JAMES ROSS 

Dilley, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Kappa Alpha, Secretary, President. 



BAKER, DEWEY 
Winters, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: P.E. 

Kappa Sigma; "S" Association. 




James Ross Avant 



Charles Bass 




BARE, TED 
Chino, California 
M.A. 

Major: Education 



BASS, CHARLES 
Bartlett, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Economics 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Veterans. 




Kenneth Bass Raymond Beckman 



Bob Bisbey 





BIRKELBACH, MELVIN 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 
Megaphone Staff. 





Melvin Birkelbach 



BISBEY, 
Galveston, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Phi Delta Theta, Treasurer, '49; Rush Captain, '49; 
Intramural Captain, '48; Mask and Wig; Panhellenic; 
Pre-Med. 




Clara Mae Blocksom 



Eddie Brandt 



BLOCKSOM, CLARA MAE 
Roswell, New Mexico 
B.A. 

Major: Drama 

Alpha Delta Pi, Vice-president '47-'48, Social Chair- 
man '49, Song Leader '49-'50; Mask and Wig, Secre- 
tary '47-'48, Vice-President '49-'50, Board of Directors 
'49-'50; Pi Epsilon Delta, President '48-'49; Fine Arts 
Honor Society; Kappa Phi; Cardinal Key; A Cappella 
Choir '49-'50; Who's Who '49-'50. 



BRANDT, EDDIE 
Elgin, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Phys. Ed. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Athletic Director. 



BRAZIL, PAT 
Lometa, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Home Economics 



BREEDING, JERRY 
Ft. Worth, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



BRIGMAN, GEORGE 
Uvalde, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Physics, Mathematics 

Kappa Alpha, Vice-President; Southwestern Science 
Society; Alpha Chi; Band; A Cappella Choir. 



BROWN, DORIS ANN 
Rocksprings, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Home Economics 

Delta Delta Delta, President, Vice-President, Pledge 
Trainer; Most Outstanding Junior; Home Economics 
Club, Secretary, Treasurer, Historian, Vice-President, 
President; Physical Culture Club, President; Cardinal 
Key, Secretary; Pi Gamma Mu, Vice-President, Presi- 
dent; Women's Panhellenic, Vice-President; Inter- 
fraternity Council, Secretary; Secretary Sophomore 
Class; Secretary Senior Class; Secretary of Student 
Association; Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities; Miss Southwestern. 



BOOZER, AUBREY, JR. 

Houston, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: P.E. 

Pi Kappa Alpha, President; "S" Association. 



BULGERIN, HAROLD 
New Braunfels, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 

Alpha Chi; Science Society; Pre-Med Association. 




George Brigman 



Doris Ann Brown 



BURNS, JOE 
Cuero, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 
Phi Delta Theta 



BURNS, J. D. 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: P.E. 




Joe Burns 



J. D. Burns 



35 




BURTON, CAROL 

San Antonio, Texas 

B.S. in Education 

Major: History and Government 

Phi Delta Theta. 



BUTLER, MARTHA 
Karnes City, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Biology 



BYRAM, STILES 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Business 
Kappa Sigma. 



CABRON, EDWIN 
Waelder, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Geology 

Independents; Lithadelphic Society, Vice-President. 



Stiles Byram 



Edwin Cabron 



Eugenia Cameron 




La Ree Calame 



CALAME, LA REE 
Tehuacana, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Elementary Education 

Phi Mu, Life Service; Glamazon, Secretary '4 



CAMERON, EUGENIA 
Houston, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Biology 

Alpha Delta Pi, Recording Secretary; Pre-Med Club; 
Kappa Phi; Glamazons. 




CAMP, COLLEEN 
Saltillo, Mexico 
B.A. 

Major: Biology 

Zeta Tau Alpha, Historian; Pre-Med. 



CANNON, BARBARA 
Henderson, Texas 
B.F.A. 

Major: Music Education 

Phi Mu, President, Secretary, Song Leader; Methodist 
Student Fellowship, Vice-President, Worship Chair- 
man; Cardinal Key, Treasurer; Delta Omrcron. 



Colleen Camp 



Barbara Cannon 



CAVITT, SHERIDAN 

Bartlett, Texas 

B.S. in Education 

Major: History and Government 

Social Chairman Pi Kappa Alpha; Pi Epsilon Delta; 

Mask and Wig; Board of Directors '49; Spanish Club 

'47-'48; M. S. F. Council '48. 




CARLSON, VIRGIL 
Hutto, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Eusiness 
Pi Gamma Mu. 




Virgil Carlson 




Wallace Cayard Mary Louise Chafin 



CHARLES, JOHN 
Rockdale, Texas 
• B.S. 

Major: Geology and Mineralogy 
Independents; Lithadelphic Society, Secretary-Treas- 
urer '49, Vice-President '49-'50. 



CHARLES, ODELL 
Rockdale, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Pi Gamma Mu, Sentinel '49-'50; Independents. 



Odell Charles 




COATS, ALMA, MRS. 
London, England 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 
Pre-Medical Society. 



CROW, PATSY 
Smithville, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Home Economics 

Delta Delta Delta, Corresponding Secretary; Home 
Economics Club; Band. 




Mrs. Alma Coats 



Patsy Crow 





CROWNOVER, LARRY 

Llano, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Kappa Sigma, Grand Master; Blue Key 



DANIEL, McAFEE 
Frost, Texas 
BA. 

Major: English 

Alpha Chi '49-'50; Independents. 



Preston Darland 



Frances Deckard 



DARLAND, PRESTON 
Beaumont, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Phi Delta Theta, Historian and Librarian '49, Reporter 
'50; Annual '49-'50, Senior Editor. 



DECKARD, FRANCES 
Springfield, Missouri 
B.M.E. 

Major: Music Education 

Phi Mu; Delta Omicron, President, '49-'50; A Cap- 
pella Choir; Fine Arts Honor Society; Cardinal Key; 
Secretary of Student Body '48-'49; Secretary of Honor 
Council '49-50; Student Senate '47-'48, '49; Who's 
Who. 



Henry Deschner 




DESCHNER, HENRY 
Gonzales, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Geology and Mineralogy 
Band '46-'48; Sinfonietta '48-'50; Independent Coun- 
cil '47-'48; M. S. F. Council '48-'49; Lithadelphic 
Society, President '49-'50; Men's Glee Club; A Cap- 
pella Choir '47-'49. 



DEES, MATT 
Llano, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Historian; Science Society. 



DE LA ROSA, LUIS 
Mexico City, Mexico 
B.A. 

Major: Chemistry 



DE WOODY, PAUL 
Houston, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 
Pre-Med; Science Society. 



Luis De La Rosa 



Paul De Woody 



DICKINSON, CALVIN 
Taylor, Texas 
B.S.E. 

Major: Secondary Education and Psychology 



EIMANN, GILBERT 
Brenham, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Pi Gamma Mu. 



Gilbert Eimann 




EZELL, LAURIE 
Hull, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: English 

Phi Mu, Pledge Director, '49-'50; Mask and Wig; 
Spanish Club, Program Chairman; Home Economics 
Club, '48-'49. 



FEAGIN, ROBERT 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Physics 




Laurie Ezell 



Robert Feagin 



FEAGIN, VIRGINIA, MRS. 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Religious Education 



FERNANDEZ, MARGIE 
Fishkill, New York 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Delta Zeta; Pi Gamma Mu, Secretary, Treasurer; 
Alpha Chi. 




Margie Fernandez 



Mrs. Virginia Feagin 






FLYNT, BROOKS 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Men's Glee Club; Independents. 



FOLSE, PARKER 
Beaumont, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Art 

Phi Delta Theta; Blue Key; Sigma Phi Alpha; Pi Delta 
Epsilon; Mask and Wig, S. C. A. Council '46; "Mega- 
phone," Art Editor '48-'50; "Southwestern Magazine," 
Art Editor '48-'50; "Sou'wester," Editor-in-Chief 49-'50; 
Track '48-'50; "S" Association; Vice-President of 
Senior Class of '50. 



John Foster 



FOSTER, JOHN 
San Antonio, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 

Phi Delta Theta; Blue Key; Pre-Med, Program Chair- 
man; Student Senate; Vice-President of Student As- 
sociation; President of Senior Class of '50. 



FRAZER, JOE DOWDY 
San Antonio, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business 

Kappa Sigma, G. P. '49, Guard '4 



i; "S" Association. 



Bruce Galloway 




FROMER, CHARLES 
Eddy, Texas 

B.A. — Magna Cum Laude 
Major: Bible 

Ministerial Association; Alpha Chi '49-'50; Veterans. 



GALLOWAY, BRUCE 
Elsa, Texas 
B.A. — Cum Laude 
Major: Bible 

Ministerial-Life Service, Secretary '48-'49; Worship 
Chairman '49-'50; Independent Association, General 
Planning Chairman '49-'50; Glee Club '48-49. 




Peter Gaupp 



Margaret Glendenning 



GAUPP, PETER 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Sociology 

S. C. A. Council, Community Service Chairman; In- 
dependents. 



GLENDENNING, MARGARET 

McAllen, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Biology 

Science Society; Pre-Med; Independents. 



GOETHE, GEORGE ARTHUR, MRS. 

Georgetown, Texas 

B.F.A. 

Major: Voice 

Delta Zeta, Social Chairman '46-'47; Delta Omicron. 



GORDON, THOMAS WELDON 

Georgetown, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 




Thomas Weldon Gordon 



Mrs. George Arthur Goethe 



GRIFFIN, BYRON 
Lake Jackson, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry — Biology 

Pre-Medical Association, President; Phi Delta Theta, 
Secretary, Rush Captain, Pledge Master; Mask and 
Wig; Blue Key. 



GUINN, CHARLES 
West Columbia, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Kappa Alpha, Treasurer; Football '4 



-'49; Track '49. 





Charles Guinn 



HESLER, RICHARD WALTER 

Georgetown, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Sociology 

Pi Kappa Alpha, Alumni Secretary; Spanish Club; 
Mask and Wig. 



HAMMOND, THOMAS McLEAN 

Burnet, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Biology. 

Kappa Alpha; Pre-Medical Association. 




Thomas McLean Hammond 



Richard Hesler 




HARTWELL, 



)WARD 



Texas 



Houston, 
B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

S. C. A. Council, President of International Relations 
Club; Sou'wester Staff '48-'49, Snapshot Editor; Blue 
Key. 



HAYNES, HUGH 
Crowell, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: History 
Ministerial Association. 




Edward Hartwell 



Hugh Haynes 



41 



James Hoffpauir 





HOFFPAUIR, JAMES 
Vidor, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Pi Gamma Mu; Phi Delta Theta. 




Naomi Hersh 



HERSH, NAOMI 
Elizabeth, New Jersey 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 




HOLL1NGSWORTH, BEVERLY 

Houston, Texas 

B.M.E. 

Major: Music Education 

Phi Mu; Delta Omicron; A Cappella Choir; 
Phi Alpha. 



Sigma 



HOLLOW AY, HENRY 
Hondo, Texas 
B.M.E. 

Major: Music Education 

Independents; Blue Key; Sigma Phi Alpha; S. C. A. 
Council, Vice-President, President. 



Beverly Hollingsworth 



Henry Holloway 



Jean Howard 




James Howard 



HOWARD, JAMES 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Phi Delta Theta. 



HOWARD, JEAN 
Brownsville, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Alpha Delta Pi. 




Merritt Hulburd 



Charlotte Hyde 



HULBURD, MERRITT 
Media, Pennsylvania 
B.A. 

Major: English 
Independents. 



HYDE, CHARLOTTE 
Silsbee, Texas 
B.A. 

Major Secondary Education 

Alpha Delta Pi; Mask and Wig; Kappa Phi; Girls 
Chorus; Spanish Club. 



IRVINE, SUZETTE 

Los Angeles, California 

B.A. 

Major: Sociology 
Independents; Glamazons. 



Mordant Tapley Jackson 



JACKSON, MORDANT TAPLEY 

Marble Falls, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Education and History 
Veterans Association. 



JAMES, BARBARA 
Corpus Christi, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Home Economics 

Phi Mu; Home Economics Club. 



JOINER, LEMUEL HENRY 
San Saba, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Veterans Association, Secretary. 




Barbara James 



Lemuel Henry Joiner 



JOINER, ROBERT 
Tyler, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Bible 

Life Service-Ministerial Association, 
Independent Association, President. 



Lloyd Wayne Jones 



Vice-President; 



JONES, LLOYD WAYNE 
West Columbia, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Kappa Alpha, President; "S" Association. 



KIKER, ORBIE 
Rotan, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



KOENIG, ROBERT 
Baytown, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Kappa Alpha; "S" Association; Football '47, 



'48, '49. 




Orbie Kiker 



Robert Koenig 



Frank Lackey 





\ / 

Daniel Frank Kopecky 




KOPECKY, DANIEL FRANK 

Granger, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Education 
Pi Gamma Mu. 



LACKEY, FRANK 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 



LANDRUM, LAWRENCE 
Galveston, Texas 
BA. 

Major: Philosophy 
Phi Delta Theta. 



Lawrence Landrum George Frank Lawhorn 



LAWHORN, GEORGE FRANK 

Rockwall, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Physical Education 
Kappa Alpha. 



Ruth Lanette Lewis 





LEATHERWOOD, HAROLD 
West Columbia, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Physics 

Kappa Alpha, House Manager '47- 
'49. 



Historian '46- 




LEWIS, RUTH LANETTE . 

Hutto, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Drama 

Mask and Wig, Scribe '48-'49,- Treasurer '49-50; Car- 
dinal Key, Historian '49-'50; Alpha Chi '48-'50, Secre- 
tary '49-'50; Pi Epsilon Delta, President '49-'50; Pan 
American Forum, President '48-'50; Poetry Reading — 
1st Place '48; Acting Award '48; Laura Kuykendal! 
Speech Trophy '49; Who's Who '49-'50. 



LOCKEY, EDWIN MORRIS, JR. 

Palestine, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



LUNDGREN, EDWIN 
Elgin, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



Edwin Morris Lockey, Jr. Edwin Lundgren 



LUTONSKY, ROY WESLEY 

Taylor, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Mathematics 



Richard Charles Lynch 



LYNCH, RICHARD CHARLES 

Hondo, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Physical Education 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 



MACKENZIE, NANCY LEE 

Houston, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: English 

Phi Mu, Vice-President '48; Secretary '49; Scholarship 
Award '49; Beauty Nominee '50; Mask and Wig '46- 
'48; Glamazons, "Miss Glamazon" '49, Vice-President 
'49; Cardinal Key '49-'50; Annual Staff, Freshman 
Editor '47; Associate Editor '48, Editor '49; Magazine 
Staff '49; Spanish Club '46-'48. 



MANLEY, JOHN 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Journalism 

Kappa Sigma, Historian; Veterans Organization; Can- 
terbury Club. 




Nancy Lee Mackenzie 



John Manley 



McLURE, DOROTHY MARIE 

Dallas, Texas 

B.F.A. 

Major: Piano 

Girls Chorus; Delta Omicron, Historian '48, Alumnae 
Secretary '49-'50; Sigma Phi Alpha. 



McCORMICK, CHARLES ALLEN 

Florence, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Veterans Organization; Spanish 
Club 



Charles Allen McCormick 




MASSEY, ROBERT J. 

Jarrell, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Geology 

Lithadelphic Society, President. 



MAY, WARREN 
Georgetown, Texas 
M.A. 

Major: History and Government 




Robert J. Massey 



Warren May 




MAYS, ELDON 
Texarkana, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: History and Government 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Student Senate. 



MAYS, WELDON 
Texarkana, Texas 
M.Ed. 

Major: Education 

Pi Kappa Alpha; "S" Association; President of Sopho- 
more, Freshman, Junior Classes. 



Nancy Medley 



Jo-Lou Meitzen 



MEDLEY,. NANCY 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Speech and Drama 

Delta Delta Delta, Treasurer, Corresponding Secre- 
tary; Kappa Phi, Vice-President, Corresponding Sec- 
retary; S. C. A., Secretary and Treasurer; Mask and 
Wig, Treasurer, Secretary; Pi Epsilon Delta, Secre- 
tary. 



MEITZEN, JO-LOU 
Dickinson, Texas 
B.M.E. 

Major: Music Education 

Independents; Sigma Phi Alpha; Life Service Organ- 
ization; M. S. F. Council; Cardinal Key; A Cappella 
Choir; Girls Chorus. 




MELTON, FRANCES LEE 
Fredericksburg, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Sociology 

Life Service Organization, Vice-President '49-'50, 
President '50; Glamazons, Treasurer '49-'50; Delta 
Delta Delta, Chaplain '50; M. S. F. Council, Recrea- 
tion Chairman '49-'50; Pi Gamma Mu. 



MICHAEL, GEORGE 
Houston, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Football; Baseball. 



MONKHOUSE, CHARLES H. 

Hondo, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Phi Delta Theta, House Manager 
'49. 



48; Rush Captain 



MONTGOMERY, ROBERT A. 

Three Rivers, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: History and Government 
Independents; Pi Gamma Mu; Alpha Chi. 



Charles E. Monkhouse Robert A. Montgomery 



46 



MUNGER, MARILEE 
Naperville, Illinois 
B.S. 

Major: Home Economics 

Glamazons; Home Economics Club; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Life Service Organization; Phi Mu; M. Y. F. Council 
'48-'49. 



NELSON, GEORGE 
Taylor, Texas 
B.M.E. 

Major: Music Education 

Phi Delta Theta, President '46, Chorister '48-'50; Uni- 
versity Band, President '48-'50; Blue Key; Sigma Phi 
Alpha, President '50; University Sinfonietta. 



NIXON, CHARLES H. 
San Saba, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Kappa Sigma, House Manager, 
Treasurer. 



NORWOOD, JOHN MARTIN 
Carrizo Springs, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Physics 



Pledge Captain, 




Charles E. Nixon 



John Martin Norwood 



PACE, BETTY 
Brownsville, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: History and Government 

Alpha Chi; Pi Gamma Mu; S. C. A., President. 




Thomas Jennings Pace 




PACE, THOMAS JENNINGS 

Iowa Park, Texas 

M.Ed. 

Major: Education 
Pi Kappa Alpha 




Betty Pace 



PARMLEE, BARBARA GRATZ, MRS. 

Honolulu, T. H. 

B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Phi Mu; Spanish Club; Home Economics Club. 



PARMLEE, DAN 
Houston, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
"S" Association; Pi Kappa Alpha. 



Mrs. Barbara Gratz Parmlee 



Dan Parmlee 




PARR, ANN 
Amarillo, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Alpha Delta Pi, Historian '48-'49, Corresponding Sec- 
retary '49-'50; Kappa Phi, President '48-'49; Corre- 
sponding Secretary '49-'50; Cardinal Key; Student 
Senate; A Cappella Choir '48-'49; Annual Staff; Pan 
American Club; Mask and Wig. 



PATTERSON, ROBERT 

Lufkin, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Sociology 

S. C. A. Council; Independents; Life Service Organ- 
ization; A Cappella Choir; Mens Chorus. 




PETERMAN, LESTER LEE 
Fredericksburg, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Veterans Organization; Phi Delta Theta. 



PIEPER, BEN WALTER 
Dallas, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 



Lester Lee Peterman Ben Walter Pieper 



Noel Ray Priest 




PRIEST, HENRY ODELL 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Physical Education 




PRIEST, NOEL RAY 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Physical Education 
"S" Association. 



PRY, GUY 
Anahuac, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 

Alpha Chi, Vice-President; Science Society, President; 
Blue Key, Corresponding Secretary; Life Service- 
Ministerial Association, President; M. S. F. Council. 



REED, ROBERTA 
Holland, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Home Economics 

Kappa Phi, Recording Secretary; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Alpha Chi; Home Economics Club, Second Vice- 
President. 



Roberta Reed 




RIEMENSCHNEIDER, HENRY 

Yoakum, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: English 

Blue Key; Independents; S. C. A. Council; M. S. F. 




Gene Rivet 



RIVET, GENE 
Beaumont, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Accounting 
Kappa Sigma. 




Henry Riemenschneider 



SCOTT, BENNETT NORTON 

Georgetown, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Pi Gamma Mu; Ministerial. 



SHELL, TURNER A. 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma, Alumni Secretary '49, Vice-President 
'50. 




Bennett Norton Scott 



Turner A. Shell 



SHELLEY, J. CHARLES 

Rogers, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Sociology 

President of Student Association; Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; "S" Association; Blue Key, '49-'50; Who's 
Who; Football; Baseball; Independents, President '48- 
'49; S. C. A., Treasurer '48-'49. 



SHEPPARD, HENRY 
Cuero, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Journalism 

Who's Who '49-'50; Co-Captain Football Team '49; 
Baseball, 1-year Letterman; Student Manager; Kappa 
Sigma; Megaphone, Editor '48-'49; Blue Key; Kappa 
Sigma Area Scholarship Winner '49-'50; Pi Epsilon 
Delta; "S" Association, Secretary-Treasurer '48-'49; 
Student Senate '49; Vice-President Sophomore Class 
'47-'48; Vice-President Junior Class '48-'49; Veterans 
Association. 



SHIRES, J. D., JR. 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Independents. 



SKELTON, BARBARA GAIL 

Houston, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 

Alpha Delta Pi, Corresponding Secretary '47-'48; So- 
cial Chairman '48-'49. Jm 




J. D. Shires, Jr. Barbara Gail Skelton 



Joe Wade Stansell 




SNOWDY, LOUIS A. 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Band; Mask and Wig; Ministerial Association. 




Louis A. Snowdy 



STANSELL, JOE WADE 

Killeen, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Physical Education 
Kappa Sigma; Blue Key, Vice-President; 
Mu, President; Veterans Organization, 
President Senior Class. 



Pi Gamma 
President; 




STONECIPHER, DONALD L. 

Houston, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 
Kappa Alpha. 



SWENSON, GLEN 
Austin, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Physical Education 
Football. 



Donald L. Stonecipher 



Glen Swenson 



Joyce Terry 




Fred S. Switzer 



SWITZER, FRED S. 
Cuero, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Journalism 

Phi Delta Theta, President '47-'48, Vice-President '46- 
'47, Alumni Secretary '47-'49, Intramural Manager 
'47-'49; Blue Key, President '49-'50; Mask and Wig 
'48-'50, Business Manager '49-'50, Board of Governors 
'49-'50; Megaphone Staff '46-'50, Editor '49-'50; An- 
nual Staff, Sports Edito'r '48-'49, Activities Editor '49- 
'50; Veterans Organization, Vice-President '49-'50; 
Spanish Club '46-'49; Who's Who '49-'50; Magazine, 
Associate Editor '46-'47. 



TERRY, JOYCE 
Palacios, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: Mathematics 

Kappa Phi; Kappa Chi; Alpha Chi; Science Society, 
Vice-President; M. S. F. Council '48-'49; Spanish Club, 
Secretary '48-'49; Band; Girls Chorus; Megaphone 
Staff. 




THORNALL, MADGE 
Houston, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: English 

Phi Mu, Reporter '47-'49, Publicity Chairman, '48-'49, 
Scholarship Chairman '49-'50; Glamazons, Vice- 
President '48-'49; Secretary '49-'50; Megaphone Staff 
'47-'49, Reporter, Society Editor, Columnist; Sou'- 
wester Staff, Organization Editor '47-'49, Literary 
Editor '48-'49; Home Economics Club '47-'50, Reporter 
'48-'49; Sigma Tau Delta, Freshman Class Reporter 
'47-'48; Magazine Feature Writer; One-Act Play Cast 
'47; Mask and Wig '47-'49. 





Madge Thornall 



Ethel B. Trout 



so 



TROUT, ETHEL B. 
Texas City, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Secondary Education 

Delta Delta Delta, Librarian Custodian '48-'49; Re- 
cording Secretary '49-'50; Forensic Club '49-'50, Sec- 
retary Treasurer; Chorus '46-'47; Mask and Wig 
'46-'47. 



TOLEMAN, THOMAS 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.S. 

Major: Geology 

Lithadelphic Society, President. 



VAUGHN, ELLA FRANCES 

Bay City, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Biology 

Delta Delta Delta, President '49-'50, Historian '46-47; 
Women's Panhellenic Council, President '49-'50; 
Lithadelphic Society, Historian '48-'49; Pre-Medical 
Association; Band, Secretary-Treasurer '47-'48; Sin- 
fonietta; Girls Chorus. 




Ella Frances Vaughn 



Thomas Toleman 





WALTON, DURWARD GRADY 

Center Point, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: History 

S. C. A.; Kappa Chi; Alpha Chi; Independents; Pi 
Gamma Mu. 



WEBB, MARY LYNN 

Elgin, Texas 

B.M. 

Major: Piano 

Who's Who; Cardinal Key, Vice-President '48-'49; 
Alpha Chi; Science Society; Fine Arts Honor Society, 
President '49; Independents, President '48; S. C. A. 
Cabinet '47-'49; M. S. F. Cabinet '47-'48; Glamazons, 
President '48; Life Service; Mask and Wig '46-'47; 
A Cappella Choir; Girls Chorus; Neas Prize in Music 
'49. 




Durward Grady Walton Mary Lynn Webb 



WHITE, MARJORIE LAWS 

Lufkin, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Alpha Delta Pi, Treasurer, President; Glamazons; 
Mask and Wig. 



WILLIAMS, BARNEY W. 
Indian Head, Maryland 
B.S. 

Major: Chemistry 



WILLIAMS, RICHARD EARL 

Cameron, Texas 

B.B.A. 

Major: Business Administration 
Phi Delta Theta, Alumni Secretary, '47, Treasurer, 
'48; House Manager '48, '50, President '49; Blue Key; 
Senior Class Senator; Pi Gamma Mu, Torch Bearer; 
Inter-fraternity Council, President '49-'50; Men's Pan- 
hellenic, President '49-'50. 



WILSON, YVONNE 
Silsbee, Texas 
B.M.E. 

Major: Music Education 

Alpha Delta Pi, President '48-'49, Vice-President '49- 
'50; Kappa Phi; Cardinal Key, President '49-'50; A 
Cappella Choir '47-'50; Mask and Wig; S. C. A. Coun- 
cil; Alpha Chi; Delta Omicron, Vice-President '49-'50; 
Sigma Phi Alpha; Honor Council '49-'50; Who's Who 
'49-'50. 




Richard Earl Williams 



Yvonne Wilson 




WOLFF, DUANE EVERETT 

Houston, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Sociology 



WOOD, MARGARETTE HALL, MRS. 

Georgetown, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: English 



WOOD, WILBUR RUSSELL 

Georgetown, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Physics 



WOOTEN, ODELL OSCAR 

Bertram, Texas 

B.S. 

Major: Geology 



Wilbur Russell Wood 



Odell Oscar Wooten 



Joan Bernice Wood 




WOOD, JOAN BERNICE 
Georgetown, Texas 
B.A. 

Major: English 

Alpha Delta Pi, Chaplain, Beauty; Cardinal Key; 
Cheerleader; Pan American Forum, Treasurer; Foot- 
ball Queen. 



YEAMAN, JOHN FRANCIS 

Austin, Texas 

B.A. 

Major: Psychology 

Ministerial Organization; Men's Chorus; Independ- 
ents. 



John Francis Yeaman 



52 




So HAIL the conquering heroes! 
At last they made it — at last 
they are graduates!!! It took 
everything but a steam shovel to 
get them out of here, but through 
the combined efforts of the facul- 
ty and interested friends, they 
made it! 

Now they are ready to meet the 
cruel world, which had better look 
out. A handshake, good luck, and 
Godspeed go with them always. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



Officers pictured above are, left, to right, Albert Gore, 
vice-president; Margaret Weston, secretary; and Bobo 
Hardy, president. 

Highlighting the activities of the year for the junior class 
was a fine picnic held in the latter part of April. Juniors and 
their dates rode out to San Gabriel Park on a big truck, 
minus hay, so it couldn't be called a hayride. A baseball 
game — boys versus girls — built up appetites for supper. 
And what a supper!!! Barbecued beef, potato salad, red 
beans, and all the trimmings. A grand time was had by 
everyone. 

The Juniors will have a hard row to hoe next year trying 
to live up to the accomplishments of this year's seniors, but 
we know they will try. 



On the following pages are this 
year's Juniors, or the class of '51. 




Peggy Bryan 

Wilburn Buttery 




Lester Calhoun Howard Cary Oney Chafin 




Tom Collins 



Bettie Curtis 

57 



Evelyn Deschner 



John Dibrell 



Kay Daniel 
Martha De La Fosse 

Gloria Diltz Hazel Dollahon Helen Durrenberger Harvey Fairchild 




Katy Gallaway Albert Gore 

58 



Wendell Graves Marvin Gray Barbara Griffith Alvin Guthrie Alice Hallauer 

Jerry Hardin Bobo Hardy Carroll Harris Ralph Hasten Lou Haynes 




Beryl Kermeth 



Curtis Ledbetter 

59 



Ruth McCain 



James McClendon 



Betty Lengefeld 



Kathryn Liese 
Frances McCleskey Betty McCoy 



Bonnie McCurdy 



Lola McGaughey 





Wilson McPhail 



Gerald Matthews 



Hubert Merritt 






60 



Richard Moon 



Jack Murray 



C. C. Musch Earl Nelson Patsy Overton Elizabeth Peters Arthur Pry 

Richard Quigley Paul Rader Joe Ray Lewis Reed Virginia Robinson 




Billy Stephenson 



Ina Sutherland 

61 



Patricia Traylor 



Harold Treibs 



Gayle Toliver 
Phyllis Trahan 

Catherine Weeks Margaret Weston Eugene White Frank White 




Lila Whitefield Betty Lou Williams Mitchell Wommack 




Eugene Wood Jim Youngblood 

62 




And so these 

Have completed another year 



Virginia Spencer, Marlee Baker, Charlie Dennis. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 



The sophomores chose as their officers for the year the three smiling characters 
pictured above: Virginia Spencer, vice-president, Marlee Baker, secretary, and 
Charlie Dennis, president. 

On December 10 the sophomores collaborated with the freshmen to give their 
annual all-school dance in Jim West Gymnasium. The gym was decorated with 
Christmas angels, boughs of evergreen, and real (well, almost real) snow. The 
dance provided an opportunity for the whole school to get together before the 
Christmas holidays. 

The sophomore year is perhaps the hardest year of all, for the students have 
just gotten over the uncertainty of being freshmen and must begin to make decisions 
about their course in life. Now, next year, it's forward march! 



On the next pages are this year's Sophomores — 




72 



Ben Marney Malcolm Mathison 



Joan Matthews 




77 




ARRIVE 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 




Ah, happy, carefree freshmen! Little do they know of what is before them — 
or maybe they do have an inkling after completing one year of college work. The 
phrase so often applied to freshmen — that "they have a long road ahead of 
them" — may be true, but along that road they will find pleasant days filled with 
satisfying study and rewarding companionships. 

Next year they will be sophomores, and ready to build another step in the stair- 
way leading to graduation. Climb the steps carefully but quickly, and do not stop 
to look behind you, lest you stumble. Look ever to the future, and there find your 
dreams. 



On the next pages are the freshmen 
of today, the seniors of 1953. 




81 




82 






Raymond Roy Nordeen, Jr. 

^ ■ ™ Franklin Ray Painter 




Jean Reid 



Jane Ritchie 




Barbara Nash 




Lester J. Peterson, Jr. 




Betty Jean Robertson 



86 





Dean Stinnett 





Earl D. Sullivan 



Joe Stone 




87 



Richard Thomas 



Mark P. Thomas, Jr 




Sally Vaughn 




Joe Bryan Watterson 





Ann Walker 




Mary Frances Weisinger 



Marilyn Wheeler 



Barney H. Timmins, Jr. 




Dorothy Ann Walser 




Sarah Ann Weldon 




Gloria Triggs 




Grady T. Watkins 




Richard S. Werner 




Betty Jean Wilson 



Melanie Williams 





William Youngblood Jill Taylor 



89 



I ■ 



Three smiling lassies: Sammie McLelland, 
Mary Fiances Weisinger, Marilyn Wheeler. 



ADPi's homecoming decorations show 
spirit of S. U. supporters. 




The Alamo holds a tender spot in Are you trying to show Porky Studying, (?) no doubt! 

the hearts of Herb Rohloff, Kuhn how to stand, Alice? 

Rountree, Sue Ann Landrum, and 
HollisHall. 




The unknown must still be unknown, 
judging by Evans' expression. 




First Row: Helen Brown, Clara Mae Blocksom, Edith Butler, Betty Clendenin, Brucene Cox, Joann Evans, Jean Anne Giddings, 
Betty Gray, Mary Hallauer. 

Second Row: Charlotte Hyde, Lucille Haynes, Margie Hill, Jean Howard, Daisy Johnston, Beryl Kenneth, Sue Ann Landrum, Ann 
Leeman, Sammie McClelland. 

Third Row: Betty McCoy, Carrie Jo Mitchell, Lois Muckleroy, Patsy Overton, Ann Parr, Joyce Peacock, Joan Dee Quinn, Betty Jean 
Robertson, Kuhn Rountree. 

Fourth Row: Gail Skelton, Helen Marie Smith, Barbara Sneed, Wynona Terry, Mary Frances Weisinger, Marilyn Wheeler, Mary Vir- 
ginia White, Betty Lou Williams, Joan Wood, Joan Young. 



ALPHA DELTA P 



PRESIDENT: MARJORIE LAWS 
VICE-PRESIDENT: YVONNE WILSON 
SECRETARY: JEAN CAMERON 
TREASURER: ALICE HALLAUER 



Alpha Delta Pi was founded at Wesleyan Female College in Macon, Georgia, in 1851. Zeta Chapter 
of Alpha Delta Pi was established at Southwestern University in 1907. The Faculty Advisor is Mrs. John V. 
Berglund. There are four Alumnae Advisors: Mrs. I. J. McCook, Jr., Mrs. Calvin Sanders, Mrs. Wallace 
Evans, and Mrs. Billy Hoffman. 



Laws Wilson Cameron Hallauer 




93 





Cute as a bug!! 




I det wid of moooooore puddy tats 
dat way!!! 



Those grins are brighter than the sun- 
light! Somebody catch those books be- 
for D. A. drops them!!! 



Bear hugs for Mary Alice, 
Ann, and Dot. 





First Row: Gloria Avant, Hallie Baker, Marlee Baker, Oras Ann Beaver, Dene Brodnax, Doris Ann 
Brown, Joan Corwin, Dot Clark. 

Second Row: Pat Crow, Louise Crowder, Betty Crump, Ann Dalchau, Barbara Dunn, Pat Garrett, 
Ann Hasse, Alice Henderson. 

Third Row: Alicia Hodges, Martha Holland, Betsy Inglis, Camilla Lanham, Mary Faye Matejowsky, 
Kay McKinney, Nancy Medley, Frances Melton. 

Fourth Row: Mary Alice Ranfranz. Sallye Tom Smith, Virginia Spencer, Ina Sutherland Tooley, Sally 
Vaughn, Eleanor Wright. 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 

PRESIDENT: FRANKIE VAUGHN 
VICE-PRESIDENT: KATHRYN LIESE 
SECRETARY: ETHEL TROUT 
TREASURER: RUTH ANDEREGG 

Delta Delta Delta was founded in 1888 at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts. Theta Epsilon 
Chapter was founded at Southwestern University in 1911. The Faculty Advisor is Dr. J. C. Godbey, and 
the Alumna Advisor is Mrs. J. N. R. Score. 



Vaughn Liese Trout Anderegg 





There's room enough in 
that big coat for both of 
you!! 



Light and shadows on 
Jimmie Robinett. 



Harold and Loretta all dressed up! 



Yo ho ho and a bottle of pop! 



Those few and far-between visits from her one and only 
bring smiles to Jane Gale. 




It don't mean a Heave that volley- 
thing if you ain't ball over the net, 
got that swing. Barbara! 



Can-Can, Delta Zeta style, featuring 
Kay, Ruth Mary, and Jane. 

i - 




Typical Southwestern 
charm — Jimmie Doris 
and Beth. 



i rj 







36 



This looks like the happy end- 
ing to some Lassie story, but 
it's just Barbara and her dog. 



First Row: Gretchen Becker, Ruth Mary Bell, Margie Bowen, Bettie Curtis, Kay Daniel, Loretta Davis. 

Second Row: Evelyn Deschner, Gloria Diltz, Genelle Doering, Helen Durrenberger, Margie Fernan- 
dez, Jane Gale. 

Third Row: Betty Haster, Gradylene Jordan, Johnnie Faye Lyons, Carolyn Longley, Barbara Nichol- 
son, Jan Peaslee. 

Fourth Row: Jean Porter, Phyllis Reese, Jimmie Doris Robinette, Beth Worth. 

DELTA Z E T A 

PRESIDENT: GRADYLENE JORDAN 
VICE-PRESIDENT: LORETTA DAVIS 
SECRETARY: BETTIE CURTIS 
TREASURER: MARGIE FERNANDEZ 



Delta Zeta was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in 1902. In 1946 a local sorority known 
as Lambda Sigma Gamma was established as Gamma Zeta Chapter of Delta Zeta. The Alumna Advisor 
is Mrs. Hide, and the Faculty Advisor is Mrs. Angus Springer. 




MISS HATALIE CLAPP 



KAPPA ALPHA ROSE 



She has two dreamy eyes of blue, 
Two lips beyond compare; 
Two rosy cheeks to greet you 
And a wealth of golden hair; 
She's the sweetest girl in all this world, 
The fairest flower that grows — 
She's my sunny Southern sweetheart, 
She's my Kappa Alpha Rose. 



First Row: James Avant, Paul Baker, George Brigham, Tom Collins, Lee Folse, John Flinn, Wendell Graves. 

Second Row: Marvin Gray, Charles Guinn, Al Guthrie, Lloyd Wayne Jones, Mac Hammond, Titus Harris, 
Bill Higgins. 

Third Row: Bob Koenig, Buddy Lawhorn, Harold Leathwood, Carlton Massey, Hubert Merritt, Bob Penny- 
backer, Jim Roberts. 

Fourth Row: Frank Severn, Ed Schwab, Joe Stone, Don Stonecipher, Gene Woods. 

KAPPA ALPHA 



PRESIDENT: 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY: 
TREASURER: 



FALL 
LLOYD JONES 
GEORGE BR1GMAN 
JAMES AVANT 
CHARLES GUINN 



SPRING 
JAMES AVANT 
GEORGE BRIGMAN 
JOHN FLINN 
CHARLES GUINN 



Kappa Alpha was founded at Washington and Lee University in 1865. Xi Chapter at Southwestern 
was founded in 1883. The Alumnus Advisor and Faculty Advisor is Dr. I. J. McCook. 




100 




First Row: Kenneth Adkins, Charles Baker, Dewey Baker, Stiles Byram, Howard Cary, Bill Creekmore, Larry Crownover, Myron Dees. 

Second Row: Bob Douglas, Jim Fenwick, Dick Fly, Joe Dowdy Frazer, George Frank, Bobo Hardy, Dick Hayes, Wilson McPhail. 

Third Row: Brad Miller, Jack Murray, C. C. Musch, Bob Nixon, John Wesley Puryear, Gene Rivet, Jackie Sharp, Turner Shell. 

Fourth Row: Henry Sheppard, Shelley Smith, Stanley Smith, Bill Springfield, Grady Watkins, Frank White, Bill Youngblood, Ellis 
Youngblood, Jim Youngblood. 



KAPPA SIGMA 



FALL 

GRAND MASTER: BOBO HARDY 
SPRING 

GRAND MASTER: LARRY CROWNOVER 
GRAND PROCURATOR: JIM FENWICK 
GRAND SCRIBE: GILLETTE SHEPPARD 
GRAND TREASURER: GENE RIVET 
MASTER OF CEREMONIES: JIM YOUNGBLOOD 



Kappa Sigma was founded in the United States at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, 
in 1869. Iota Chapter of Kappa Sigma was founded at Southwestern in 1888. The Faculty Advisor is 
Mr. Jack Coman, and the Alumnus Advisor is Mr. Arpee Davis. 



101 




Left: Bisbey bangs on bow stem as carpenter's helper, Darland, loafs. Other insignificant characters are lost in shadows. Top: 
The finished product and the prize-winning float. Right: Williams, Bisbey, and Ann Walker%admire trophies as Bobby Hayes and 
Preston Darland shed a tear for the last remains. Bottom: A familiar character making daily visits through the Phi Delt back yard, 
blowing whistle only during night and chapel periods. 



Below left: Phis Dick Williams 
and Parker Folse with Tri Delts 
Kay McKinney and Marlee Baker. 



To the right is pictured the apt 
variety of automotive transporta- 
tion in use at the house. 




Below, center: Fred Switzer ut- 
ters famous words, "St. Peter, I jest 
HATES to make you wait, but I 
jest gotta have another cigarette." 



Jerry Hardin advises as Griff tills 
soil for bumper crop at the Phi 
farm. 




102 



ACTIVITIES: First row - Lou Armstrong, Bob Bisbey, Joe Burns, Carol Burton, Charlie Burton, Preston Darland, Charles 
Dennis, Parker Folse. 

Second row - Byron Griffin, Bob Gunther, Jerry Hardin, Bobby Hayes, Jimmy Howard, Jimmy Hoffpauir, John Foster, 
Malcolm Mathison. 

Third row - Charles Monkhouse, Gil Morrison, Leslie Munson, George Nelson, Don Pennington, Lester Peterman, Bill 
Rankin, Richard Ray. 

Fourth row - John Rentfro, Ralph Russell, Fred Switzer, B. H. Timmons, Dick Williams, Watt Winn, Don Wolfe, 
Mitchell Wommack. 



PLEDGES: Carroll Harris, Hubert Herndon, Herbert Rholoff, Bob Schwab, Eddie Silliman, Earl Sullivan, Dick Werner. 

PHI DELTA THETA 



The past year has been a big one for Phi Delta Theta. During the homecoming activities, several 
awards were won. First place was taken for the float in the homecoming parade; also first in house deco- 
rations was copped, and second place was won in intramural singing. The Phi Delts were bested in the 
singing event by none of the other fraternities. Also on the calendar were several never-to-be-forgotten 
parties. 

Officers in the fraternity for the fall semester were Dick Williams, president; Lou Armstrong, reporter; 
Bob Bisbey, treasurer. Officers during the spring semester were Jerry Hardin, president; Preston Darland, 
reporter and Bill Rankin, treasurer. 

Phi Delta Theta was founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, as part of the well-known 
Miami Triad. Texas Gamma Chapter was founded at Southwestern in 1886. The Alumnus Advisor is Judge 
Sam V. Stone and the Faculty Advisor is Mr. Harvey D. Watts. 




Cold weather but warm 
smiles from Elaine Wag- 
ner and Nancy Macken- 
zie. 




104 



First Row: Martha Bickley, Janette Bowmer, Elaine Broadwell, Barbara Cannon, Carol Cartwright, Martha Clayton, Frances Deck- 

ard, Rebecca Dillard, Clara Jo Dyche. 
Second Row: Laurie Ezell, Nancy Foster, Beverly Hollingsworth, Barbara Horn, Margaret Horstman, Ruth Hubbard, Barbara 

James, Nancy Mackenzie, Jeannine Mullins. 
Third Row: Marilee Munger, Ruth McCain, Barbara Nash, Barbara Gratz Parmlee, Elizabeth Peters, Josephine Roberts, Nancy 

Roesler, Pat Smith, Sallie Smoot. 

Fourth Row: Madge Thornall, Bettye Gail Tidwell, Pat Traylor, Gloria Triggs, Lucille Walker, Elaine Wagner, Margaret Weston, 
Eva Jo Williams, Margaret Winfrey. 

PH! MU 



PRESIDENT: PAT TRAYLOR 
VICE-PRESIDENT: RUTH HUBBARD 
SECRETARY: SALLIE SMOOT 
TEASURER: NANCY ROESLER 



Phi Mu was founded at Wesleyan College at Macon, Georgia, in 1852. Xi Kappa Chapter was founded 
on the Southwestern campus in 1908. It was reinstated in 1941. The Faculty Advisor is Mr. John D. 
Richards. The Alumna Advisor is Mrs. Hohson Martin. 



105 




106 




First Row: L. L. Ainsworth, Ray Arbuckle, Jack Armstrong, Charles Bass, Kenneth Bass, Aubrey Boozer, Eddie Brandt, Jerry Breed- 
ing, Wilburn Buttery. 

Second Row: Sheridan Cavitt, Matt Dees, Gilbert Eimann, C. N. Forsvall, Albert Gore, Richard Hesler, Willis Kelly, Orbie Kiker, 
Edwin Lockey. 

Third Row: Edwin Lundgren, Richard Lynch, Jerry Matthews, Eldon Mays, Welson Mays, Charles McCorrniqJc, Sam Michaels, Earl 
Nelson, Dan Parmlee. 

Fourth Row: Tommy Warren; Pledges - Clifton Anderson, Jimmy Berthold, Hyman Fortinberry Edgar Hardin Bill House Bob 
Lucas, C. T. MacAllister, Harry McBride, Douglas McLendon, Morrison McDaniel, Truett Mobley, Raymond Roy Noideen, 
Frank Painter, John Piercy, Joe Bert Sisson, Jimmy Snoga, Mark Thomas. 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 



PRESIDENT: AUBREY BOOZER 
VICE-PRESIDENT: L. L. AINSWORTH 
SECRETARY: WILBURN BUTTERY 
TREASURER: JERRY MATTHEWS 



Pi Kappa Alpha was founded at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1868._ The 
Southwestern chapter was first founded in 1910, and then reactivated in 1948. The Faculty Advisor is 
Mr. J. H. McCoy and the Alumnus Advisor is Mr. Herman Sullivan. 



107 




Happy and carefree - Diane and Brad. 



Lynn (with tongue in cheek): "We ran 
out of gas." 







That your car, Bobbie? 



108 



She looks like she just 
finished with registra- 
tion day! 




First Row: Sue Birdwell, Tommie Briggs, Peggy Bryan, Coleen Camp, Anna Leutwyler, Diane Coates, Jonell Cook. 
Second Row: Bobbie Griffith, Elaine Herring, Betty Lengefeld, Boyce Ann Lewis, Geraldine Luter, Joan Matthews, Alta Naylor. 
Third Row: Jean Ann Pledger, Jean Reid, Marilyn Roberson, Virginia Robinson, Lois Rutledge, Dene Stinnett, Patsy Sistrunk. 
Fourth Row: Jill Taylor, Phyllis Taylor, Dorothy Walser, Lila Whitefield, Melanie Williams. 

Z E T A TAU ALPHA 



PRESIDENT: BETTY LENGEFELD 
VICE-PRESIDENT: ANNA LEUTWYLER 
SECRETARY: BARBARA GRIFFITH 
TREASURER: VIRGINIA RUTH BRYAN 



Zeta Tau Alpha was founded at Virginia State Normal College in Farmville, Virginia, on October 15, 
1898. Lambda chapter was founded on the Southwestern campus in 1906. The Alumna Advisor is Mrs. 
William S. Lott and the Faculty Advisor is Miss Mary Wilcox. 



109 




MISS DARLENE BRUCKS 
Sweetheart of Independent Association 



no 




BLANKENSHIP SATTERWHITE 



INDEPENDENT ASSOCIATIO N 



PRESIDENT: BOB JOINER 

VICE-PRESIDENT AND PRESIDENT OF THE GIRLS: 

ELLA BLANKENSHIP 
SECRETARY-TREASURER: EDITH SATTERWHITE 
PUBLICITY: CHARLES HOPINGARDNER 
GENERAL PLANNING: BRUCE GALLOWAY 
FOOD CHAIRMAN: ANN ECKMAN 
PROGRAM CHAIRMAN: LESLIE BOONE 

The purpose of the Independent Association is to work for the common welfare of students by providing 
social activities for those who are not affiliated with any primarily social Greek letter fraternity on this cam- 
pus and by providing an opportunity for training in the principles of democracy. 

MEMBERS 



June Ashen 


Sue Gilmore 


Joe Ray 


Karl Beyer 


Anna Jean Godbey 


Roberta Reed 


Ella Blankenship 


Blitz Griffin 


Jane Ritchie 


Mary Emma Blasdel 


Henry Holloway 


Susan Rosson 


Richard Bowers 


Mansel Hudson 


Edith Satterwhit'e 


Richard Brahm 


Bonnie Jane Jackson 


Donna Jean Schroeder 


Ann Brevard 


Maryneal Jackson 


Jake Shelley 


Darlene Brucks 


Barney Janowski 


Charles Sinclair 


Gray Brucks 


Bob Joiner 


Hilliard Smith 


Kelly Burkhart 


Elaine Le Blond 


Ray Staines 


Kathy Burton 


Nila Mae Maner 


Wendy Steinman 


Don Byerley 


Ladis Marek 


David Stewart 


Gilbert Castanon 


Ben Marney 


Harriet Stewart 


Gloria Chamberlain 


Mary Marney 


John Hart Thompson 


Odell Charles 


Norma Jo Mayfield 


Grady Walton 


Loretta Dale 


Morrison McDaniel 


Ernestine Warren 


Peggy Davenport 


Peggy McGlothing 


Joe Waterson 


Patsy Davis 


Jimmy McLennon 


Mary Lynn Webb 


Marilyn Dusik 


Carson Meitzen 


Tommy Weisinger 


Ann Eckman 


Bob Messer 


Betty Wilson 


Roy Estes 


George Mitchell 


Kay Wolfer 


Harvey Fairchild 


La Doris Morgan 


Clyde Woods 


Henry Flak 


Nelda Morgan 


Elinor Wyatt 


Bruce Galloway 


Robert Patterson 




Peter Gaupp 


Art Pry 






j 




Back Row: John Foster, Jim Youngblood, John Paul Schulz. 

Middle Row: Kelly Burkhart, Dick Williams, Bill Youngblood, Mac McAllister, Eldon Mays, Don 
Stockton, Joe Cavness. 

Front Row: Jake Shelley, Nancy Foster, Betty Ann Clendenin, Gloria Triggs, Ann Parr, Dick Fly. 
Not Pictured: Doris Ann Brown, Joe Frazer, Corky Atkins. 

STUDENT SENATE 

PRESIDENT: JAKE SHELLEY 
VICE-PRESIDENT: JOHN FOSTER 
SECRETARY: DORIS ANN BROWN 

The Student Senate is Southwestern's functioning organization of student government. Members are nomi- 
nated by each class and voted on by the respective classes in the spring. All nominees must be approved by the 
faculty. 

The Senate meets regularly each week to discuss matters of importance to the student body and decide 
questions relating to student government problems. Their tireless efforts and determination to gain for the 
Southwestern students the advantages and opportunities available on larger campuses have met with high com- 
mendation and approval. 



MEMBERS 



Senior Senators 
Jake Shelley 
John Foster 
Doris Ann Brown 



Sophomore Senators 
Kelly Burkhart 
Joe Cavness 
Betty Ann Clendenin 
Don Stockton 



Ann Parr 
Eldon Mays 
Joe Frazer 



Junior Senators 
John Paul Schulz 
Jim Youngblood 
Nancy Foster 
Corky Atkins 

Freshman Senators 
Gloria Triggs 
Mac McAllister 
Bill Youngblood 



Standing: ' Don Birely, John Foster Albeit Gore, Don Stockton. 
Seated: Nancy Foster, Nancy Roesler, Darlene Brucks. 
Not Pictured: Frances Deckard, Yvonne Wilson. 




Plans for an Honor Council at Southwestern originated with the Student Senate in the spring of 1948. 
The actual organization became effective in the fall of 1949, following a vote of the student body. Members 
of the Honor Council were and are nominated by the Student Senate, approved by the administration, and 
elected by the student body as a whole. This Honor Council is the first real step toward complete student 
government; it is progressing all the time. 

The honor system at Southwestern is based on the principle that a student when placed on his honor will not 
violate this trust. Under this Honor Council, both students and faculty have certain responsibilities, and the 
Honor Council acts as co-ordinator and mediator. It acts as the judge of all charges made as a result of viola- 
tion of the honor system. Certain changes may have to be made in order for it to function properly and ade- 
quately and fairly, but basically the student is placed on his honor to keep the code set up by the Council. 

The Chairman of the Council is the Vice-President of the Student Association, this year John Foster. 
Membership of the Council consists of the Chairman, two members each from the Senior, Junior, and Sophomore 
classes, and two members from the Student Senate. Nancy Foster and Don Stockton are the representatives 
from the Senate, Frances Deckard and Yvonne Wilson are the representatives from the Senior class, Darlene 
Brucks and Albert Gore from the Junior class, and Nancy Roesler and Don Birely from the Sophomore class. 

The members of the Honor Council have a responsibility not to be belittled; the success of the plan and 
the possibility of future extension of student government rests on them. 




First Row: Kenneth Bass, Larry Crownover, Joe Dowdy Frazer, Henry Holloway. 
Second Row: Eldon Mays, Guy Pry, Henry Riemenschneider, Jake Shelley. 
Third Row: Henry Sheppard, Joe Stansell, Fred Switzer, Dick Williams. 

Not pictured: Byron Griffin, George Nelson, John Foster, and Ed Hartwell. 

BLUE KEY 

PRESIDENT: FRED SWITZER 
VICE-PRESIDENT: JOE STANSELL 
SECRETARY: GUY PRY- 
TREASURER: ELDON MAYS 



The new members chosen this spring are Parker Folse, John Paul Schulz, Bobo Hardy, Jim Youngblood, John 
Walton, Art Pry, Curtis Ledbetter, Jimmy Snoga, Harold Reynolds, Dick Fly and Jerry Hardin. 

Blue Key, established at Southwestern in 1948, is a national leadership fraternity for young men in colleges and 
universities. Its purpose is to foster leadership among students, encourage student activities, and act as a co-ordinator 
between students and faculty. 

Since Blue Key first was organized here it has taken a vital interest in all campus functions. Comparable to the 
Cardinal Key organization for young women, it has already become one of the most capable organizations on the 
campus. 



116 



First Row: Doris Ann Brown, Clara Mae Blocksom, Barbara Cannon, Frances Deckard. 
Second Row: Gradylene Jordan, Ruth Lewis, Nancy Mackenzie, Jo-Lou Meitzen. 
Third Row: Betty Pace, Ann Parr, Mary Lynn Webb, Yvonne Wilson, Joan Wood. 



CARDINAL KEY 

PRESIDENT: YVONNE WILSON 
VICE-PRESIDENT: MARY LYNN WERR 
SECRETARY: DORIS ANN RROWN 
TREASURER: RARRARA CANNON 



The new members elected this spring are Marlee Baker, Alice Hallauer, Darlene Brucks, and Betty Lou Williams. 
Cardinal Key is a national honor sorority for women leaders in colleges and universities. National Cardinal Key 
established a chapter here at Southwestern on May 14, 1948. 

The major purposes of the organization are: to recognize achievement in scholarship and extra-curricular activ- 
ities; to advance religion, patriotism, and service by affording training for leadership in the college communty; and to 
develop character by application of the Cardinal virtues of living. 

Cardinal Key corresponds to the Blue Key organization for men. Here at Southwestern it serves as an important 
link between students and faculty, and the work of Cardinal Key already has proven its worth many times over. 



WHO'S 



WHO 




Clara Mae Blocksom 
Doris Ann Brown 
Frances Deckard 
Ruth Lewis 
Betty Pace 

Henry Riemenschneider 
J. Charles Shelley 
Henry Sheppard 
Fred Switzer 
Mary Lynn Webb 
Yvonne Wilson 



Who's Who Among students in American 
Universities and Colleges is a national honor society 
for outstanding and representative students on Ameri- 
can university and college campuses. Each year a 
secret faculty committee nominates certain such students 
from among the senior group for membership in Who's 
Who. These candidates are approved by Who's Who. 
and members are officially notified of their membership 
and honor. 

Each year Who's Who publishes a book entitled 
WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES, and it is in this vol- 
ume that the honored students receive their prime recog- 
nition. Included in the volume are a brief biographical 
sketch of the student and also a sketch of the student's 
career. Membership in Who's Who is a significant 
honor highly prized by all college students, and South- 
western is extremely proud of its fine members. 



Congratulations to these students who, because of their 
outstanding work, were chosen to WHO'S WHO AMONG 
STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 




First Row: Arbuckle, Armstrong, Berglund, Bergquist, Brazil, Brown, Burton, Carlson, Chafin. 
Second Row: Charles, Deupree, Fernandez, Finch, Fox, Galyen, Gaupp, Hahn, Hersh. 
Third Row: Hesler, Hester, Luksa, Lundblad, Lundgren, Matthews, May, McClain, Medley. 
Fourth Row: Millar, Montgomery, Munger, Neas, Pace, Reed, Springer, Stansell, Steelman. 
Fifth Row: Ulrich, Waggoner, Watts, Williams, M. L., Williams, Dick. 



PI GAMMA MU 



PRESIDENT: JOE STANSELL 
VICE-PRESIDENT: DORIS ANN BROWN 
SECRETARY-TREASURER: MARGIE FERNANDEZ 
SENTINEL: ODELL CHARLES 
TORCHBEARER: DICK WILLIAMS 



Pi Gamma Mu is a national undergraduate honor society in the social sciences. It was organized nationally 
in 1924, and a strong charter chapter was established at Southwestern. Any officer, member of the teaching 
staff, alumnus, graduate student, senior, or junior whose chief work and interest is in the social sciences, 
whose scholarship is high, and who manifests special aptitude in social sciences, is eligible for membership. 



119 



HAZEL DOLLAHON 
VICE-PRESIDENT 



BETTY LOU WILLIAMS 
SECRETARY 



Alpha Chi originated at Southwestern as the Southwestern 
University Scholarship Society in 1915. Eventually this and 
similar honor societies became organized nationally, and the 
name was changed to Alpha Chi. Members of the Texas 
Alpha chapter, the local society, are elected from among the 
top or ranking tenth of the junior and senior classes. Its 
aims, according to the constitution, are stimulation, develop- 
ment, and recognition of scholarship and character. Member- 
ship in Alpha Chi is considered the highest scholastic honor 
that can be conferred upon a student at Southwestern. 

MEMBERS 



sue birdwell 
george brigman 
harold bulgerin 
McAfee daniel 
hazel dollahon 
margie fernandez 
charles fromer 
joann jones 
gradylene jordan 
ruth lewis 
kathryn liese 



NANCY MEDLEY 
ROBERT MONTGOMERY 
GUY PRY 
PAUL RADER 
ROBERTA REED 
HAROLD RENOLDS 
JOYCE TERRY 
HAROLD TREIBS 
GRADY WALTON 
MARY LYNN WEBB 
BETTY LOU WILLIAMS 



YVONNE WILSON 



First Row: Anderson, Avant, Baker, Bartak, Becker, Bloeksom, Cameron, Churchill, Clayton, Clements. 

Second Row: Clendenin, Cox, Crowder, Crump, Dollahon, Davis, Deschner, Dyche, Eckman, Giddings. 

Third Row: Haynes, Hinson, Inglis, Jackson, Kennv, Landrum, Longley, Maner, McCleskey, McCoy. 

Fourth Row: McGaughey, Medley, Mitchell, Morgan, Nelda; Morgan, Doris; Muckleroy, Parr, Porter, Reed, Reese. 

Fifth Row: Robinson, Rosson, Rutledge, Satterwhite, Smith, Sneed, Spencer, Steinman, Terry Trahar. 

Sixth Row: Warren, Weeks, White, Williams, Betty Lou; Williams, Eva Jo; Wilson, Wright. 




PHI 



PRESIDENT: BETTY LOU WILLIAMS 
VICE-PRESIDENT: NANCY MEDLEY 
SECRETARY: ROBERTA REED, ANN PARR 
TREASURER: HAZEL DOLLAHON 



Kappa Phi is a national Methodist Girls' Club and was founded on this campus as a probationary chapter in 
1946, being nationalized in 1947. It is both a religious and social organization and its chief purpose is to train 
every Christian girl in the university world today to become a leader in the church of tomorrow. 



The new spring pledges are Ann Walker, Alicia Hodges, Bonnie Jane McCurdy, Anna Jean Godbey, and 
June Ashen. 



121 




First Row: Charles Berry, Leslie Boone, Bill Campbell, Charles Dennis, Harvey Fairchild, Dick Fly, Charles Fromer, Bruce Galloway. 

Second Row: Ed Hartwell, Ralph Hasten, Hugh Haynes, Pedro Herrera, Charles Hopingardner, Bill House, B. C. Huddleston, Bob 
Joiner. 

Third Row: Lawrence Landrum, Ben Marney, Ernest Meitzen, George Mitchell, John Mood, Robert Patterson, Art Pry, Guy Pry. 
Fourth Row: Joe Ray, Harold Reynolds, Pat Sargent, Bennett Scott, J. Charles Shelley, Eddie Silliman, Louis Snowdy,' Ray Starnes. 

Not pictured: Collin Furr, Robert Haynes, Bill Palmer, Cecil Reed, Elvin Reeves, William Shirey, David Stewart, Buford Stockard, 
Almon Teel, John Walton, John Yeaman. 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT: JOHN WALTON 
VICE-PRESIDENT: LESLIE BOONE 
SECRETARY: RAY STARNES 

J 

The Ministerial Association is composed of men who are pursuing the career of 
ministers in Methodism. 



122 



First Row: Marlee Baker, Kelly Burkhart, Joe Cavness, Evelyn Deschner. 
Second Row: Petef Gaupp, Alice Hallauer, Henry Holloway, Kathryn Liese. 
Third Row: Betty Pace, John Hart Thompson, Yvonne Wilson. 
Not pictured: Nancy Roesler, Mary Lynn Webb. 



PRESIDENT: BETTY PACE 

VICE-PRESIDENT AND WORSHIP CHAIRMAN: HENRY HOLLOWAY 
SECRETARY: KATHRYN LIESE 
TREASURER: JOE CAVNESS 

COMMUNITY SERVICE CHAIRMAN: PETER GAUPP 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CHAIRMAN: ALICE HALLAUER 
PUBLICITY CHAIRMEN: NANCY ROESLER 



DEPUTATION CHAIRMAN: KELLY BURKHART 
PERSONAL CONTACT CHAIRMAN -WOMEN: YVONNE WILSON 




Of S.C.A 



MARLEE BAKER 



MEN: JOHN HART THOMPSON 



RECREATION CHAIRMAN: EVELYN DESCHNER 
CAMPUS SERVICE CHAIRMAN: MARY LYNN WEBB 



At Southwestern University there is an organization designed specifically to co-ordinate the religious and other 
activities on the campus. It consists of the entire student body; certain persons are elected in a school-wide election 
to take charge of the functioning of the organization. The Student Christian Association Council is the name given 
to this body of officers. 




BOB CASTANON 
PRESIDENT 



CURTIS LEDBETTER 
SECRETARY 



SOUTHWESTER 
LETTERMEN'S 
ASSOCIATION 



JOHN PAUL SCHULTZE 
TREASURER 



The Southwestern Lettermen's Association is an honorary organization composed of all men participating in South- 
western sports who are awarded letters at the end of the season. Lettermen are selected by the coaches on the basis of 
service, performance, and attitude; and those who receive letters well deserve them — and those who survive initiation into 
the Association deserve to be members. 

The "S" Association promotes interest in sports, and stimulates men to increase their standards, thereby increasing 
the standards of Southwestern sports. 



MEMBERS 



Bob Adair 
Bobby Aderhold 
Dewey Baker 
Aubrey Boozer 
Bob Castanon 
Jim Fenwick 
Parker Folse 
Buddy Frey 
Wendell Graves 
Herman Humble 
Bob Koenig 
Buddy Lawhorn 
Curtis Ledbetter 
Weldon Mays 
Dan Parmlee 
Henry Priest 
Noel Priest 
D. L. Saegert 
Leo Chafin 



Don Byerley 
Paul Rader 
John Paul Schultze 
Henry Sheppard 
Shelley Smith 
Bill Springfield 
Don Pennington 
Jake Shelley 
Gene White 
Frank White 
Kenneth Adkins 
Lawrence Cowley 
Carlton Massey 
Gene Davenport 
Jack Dancer 
Kelly Burkhart 
Hobert Simmons 
Floyd Pearson 
Larry Crownover 
Terrell Allen 



124 



First Row: Helen Bartak, Sue Boehm, Janette Bowmer, Peggy Bryan, Carol Cartwright, Martha Clayton, Mary Dell Cocknll. 
Second Row: Betty Crump, Bettie Curtis, Barbara Dunn, Ina Ruth Garrison, Suzette Irvine, Alice Joy Jennings, Kathryrt Liese. 
Third Row Mary Marney Nancy Mackenzie, Frances McCleskey, Nita McLennan, Frances Melton, Manlee Munger, Barbara Nash 
Fourth Row: Patsy Overton, Jane Ritchie, Jill Taylor, Madge Thornall, Dorothy Walser, Marilyn Wheeler, Marjone Laws White. 
Not pictured: Marlee Baker, Gloria Diltz. 




PRESIDENT: MARLEE BAKER 
VICE-PRESIDENT: NANCY MACKENZIE 
SECRETARY: MADGE THORNALL 
TREASURER: FRANCES MELTON 



The Glamazons is an organization for girls of five feet seven inches or more in height. Its purpose is to promote pride 
in height, dress, scholastic standards, and culture. First organized at Southwestern locally as the Basileis Society, the 
club's motto is "Divinely tall; divinely fair." Each year the Glamazons elect "Miss Glamazon." Last year this was 
Nancy Mackenzie, and this year it is Bettie Curtis. 



125 



Last Row: Smith, Ray, Dennis, Warren, Starnes, Fly, Marney, Ray, Marek, Holloway, Hasten. 

Third Row: Wilson, Nash, Gore, Thompson, Patterson, Reynolds, Henson, Kelly, Brigman Webb Davis 

Second Row: Mr John D Richards, Horstman, Blocksom, Jones, Schroeder, Whitefield, Lehman, Weisinger, Foster, Brucks, Meitzen 
tront Row: McKinney, Weeks, Dusik, Jordan, Williams, Longley, Deschner, Roesler, Hollingsworth, Deckard. 

A C A PPELLA CHOIR 

MR. JOHN D. RICHARDS, DIRECTOR 

Members of the A Cappella Choir are carefully picked by Mr. Richards, director of the choir. They must first sing with either 
the Girls' or the Men's Glee Club, before they may be eligible to try out for the A Cappella Choir. The Choir practices regularly 
every weekday except Thursday. Also, it sings for the chapel service held each week. The Southwestern A Cappella Choir is known 
throughout the state of Texas for quality of singing and excellence of performance. It has sung this year in over fifteen different towns 
and has made three separate tours, given a concert at the University of Texas, and here at Southwestern. At the crowning of Miss 
Southwestern the choir presented "Gallia" with the orchestra and Yvonne Wilson as soloist. Frances Deckard, Henry Holloway, Harold 
Reynolds, Darlene Brucks, Willis Kelly, Dick Fly, Beverly Hollingsworth, and Evelyn Deschner have also had solo parts with the 
choir this year. We of Southwestern feel that the A Cappella Choir deserves a special tribute for its fine work and superb musical 
achievement. 

Mr. John D. Richards is also director of the Men's Glee Club and Women's Chorus, which are fine singing groups. Both have 
sung frequently here on the campus and boast quite a bit of enthusiasm among their members. 

Southwestern is exceptionally proud of its musical organizations. Both students and faculty feel that the members of the 
Fine Arts Department make an invaluable contribution to Southwestern, and these music groups have become a basic and integral 
part of the school functions. 



126 



Back Row: Ray, Dennis, Mitchell, Starnes, Marney, Weisinger, Patterson, Marek, Hasten. 
Third Row: Smith, Kelly, Gore, Brigman, Meitzen, Ray, Pry, Guy; Fly. 
Second Row: Flynt, Mood, Boone, Griffin, Joiner, Woolsey, Walton, Buttery. 

First Row: Thompson, Reynolds, Yeaman, Pry, Art; Stockton, Warren, Holloway, Deschner, Mr. John D. Richards, Director. 



MEN'S CHORUS 



The men's chorus has performed several times this year in assembly and chapel and has been very well received. 
A man must be a member of the chorus in order to be eligible for the A Cappella Choir. 

The members of the chorus are not only well trained in singing but enjoy the good fellowship and pleasure that come 
from making music together. 

The girls' chorus, not pictured, also participated in varried musical activities this year, the highlight of which was 
the program which was given for the graduating seniors at the First Methodist Church on the evening of May 28th. The 
chorus along with the University Sinfonietta quartet presented several selections in honor of the seniors. 



127 



First Row: Marlee Baker, Barbara Cannon, Gloria Chamberlain, Frances Deckard, Marilyn Dusik, Peggy McGlothing. 
Second Row: Beverly Hollingsworth, Rnth Hubbard, Joann Jones, Dorothy McLure, Barbara Nash, Carolyn Longley. 
Third Row: Jane Ritchie, Donna Jean Schroeder, Elaine Wagner, Marilyn Wheeler, Yvonne Wilson. 



DELTA OMICRON 

PRESIDENT: FRANCES DECKARD 
VICE-PRESIDENT: RUTH HUBBARD 
SECRETARY-TREASURER: MARILYN DUSIK 
CHORISTER: BARBARA CANNON. 



Delta Omicron is a national professional music fraternity for women. The chapter on the Southwestern campus 
received its charter last year, on April 24, 1948. Thus it is a comparatively new addition to the Southwestern roster of 
organizations, but even in this short time it has taken its place among the prominent and valuable organizations on the 
campus. 

The purpose of the fraternity is to foster musicianship among the women, create interest in American composers and 
musicians, create interest in local musical talent, and provide an opportunity for social fellowship for its members. To 
be initiated, girls must fulfill the standards and purposes maintained by Delta Omicron, and also maintain a certain average 
in school work and music work. 



This spring, Delta Omicron presented some of its members in assembly, and gave a musical program that exemplifies 
the high ideals of the fraternity. Southwestern is proud of its chapter of Delta Omicron; and with such talent as has been 
displayed this year, there is no doubt that Delta Omicron will progress, enlarge, and become more and more valuable 
through the years. 



First Row: Marlee Baker, Clara Mae 
Blocksom, Barbara Cannon, Rebecca 

Second Row: Jerry Hardin, Beverly Hol- 
lingsworth, Henry Holloway, Ruth Hub- 
Third Row: Ruth Lewis, Dorothy Mc- 
Lure, Nancy Medley, Jo-Lou Meitzen, 

Mary Lynn Webb 




Dillard, Parker Folse. 

bard, Joann Jones. 

Harold Reynolds. 
Yvonne Wilson 



Not pictured: Frances Deckard, George Nelson, Henry Riemenschneider, Marilyn Dusik. 



SIGMA PHI ALPHA 



PRESIDENT: GEORGE NELSON 
VICE-PRESIDENT: HAROLD REYNOLDS 
SECRETARY: FRANCES DECKARD 



These students are charter members of Sigma Phi Alpha, fine arts honor society. The club is newly formed 
and was the old Mozart Society. 

Membership is limited to students doing creative work in the fields of music, literature, drama, and art. Also mem- 
bers must be of junior or senior standing and must have at least an 85 overall average. It is a distinct honor to be 
chosen for Sigma Phi Alpha, and with the fine start it has made, its prestige will grow with the years. 



The faculty sponsor for Sigma Phi Alpha is Mr. Ralph Jones. 




PI EPSILON DELTA 




Pi Epsilon Delta is a national honorary dra- 
matic fraternity. Its membership is restricted 
to juniors and seniors who have participated in 
two or more drama activities produced on the 
campus. Its chief aims are to stimulate interest 
in and raise dramatic standards and chievement 
through encourging the best individual and 
group efforts in play writing, acting, directing, 
costuming, stage technique, stage designing, 
research, and literature. Membership in Pi Ep- 
silon Delta is considered one of the highest hon- 
ors than can come to a drama student at South- 
western. 




RUTH LEWIS 
PRESIDENT 



]ERRY HARDIN 
VICE-PRESIDENT 



130 



MASK AND WIG PLAYERS 




The Mask and Wig Players is an organization of students interested in the study 
of the drama. Sponsored by Mr. Angus Springer, head of the Speech and Drama 
Department, Mask and Wig is open for membership at the beginning of each semes- 
ter. Students become Associate Members upon joining and paying dues; and after 
they have obtained ten points through active service, they may become Active Mem- 
bers. The club now has thirty active members. The aim of the organization is to 
create student interest in drama, provide a practical study of drama, and serve as a 
source for presentation of famous and current plays. 

Major productions this year were "The Late Christopher Bean," starring Ruth 
Lewis, Fred Switzer, and Nancy Medley; "Julius Caesar," starring Parker Folse, Jerry 
Hardin, Fre3 Switzer, and Norman Wahl; "The Rivals," starring Ruth Lewis, Clara Mae 
Blocksom, Fred Switzer, and Parker Folse; and "The Heiress," starring Clara Mae 
Blocksom, John McClish, and Jerry Hardin. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Kenneth Bass 
Oras Ann Beaver 
Gretchen Becker 
Clara Mae Blocksom 
Wilburn Buttery 
Sheridan Cavitt 
Loretta Davis 
Parker Folse 
Jerry Hardin 
Janet Hinson 
Henry Holloway 
Charles Hopingardner 
Beryl Kermeth 
Ruth Lewis 
Nita McLendon 



Nancy Medley 
Jan Peaslee 
Carol Potter 
Phyllis Reese 
Helen Marie Smith 
Jimmy Snoga 
Sallye Smoot 
Louis Snowdy 
Wendy Steinman 
Harriet Stewart 
Fred Switzer 
Winona Terry 
Ernestine Warren 
John Wiggins 
Yvonne Wilson 




Upper left: Ruth Lewis relates some of her treasured memories of "The Late 
Christopher Beau" to Wynona Terry. 

Center left: Mrs. Malaprop (Ruth Lewis) orders an indignant Lydia (Clara 
Mae Blocksom) to her room, as Sir Anthony Absolute (Fred Switzer) watches with 
amusement, in one of the hilarious scenes of "The Rivals." 

Lower left: Fred Switzer extolls the joys of young love as Parker Folse listens 
intently, with a few grins behind Fred's back. 



Nancy Medley as Lucy, gives 
Fag (Kenneth Bass) a coy look 
in "The Rivals." 



PRESIDENT 
JERRY HARDIN 

SECRETARY 
NANCY MEDLEY 



VICE-PRESIDENT 
CLARA MAE BLOCKSOM 



TREASURER 
RUTH LEWIS 





131 



Top Row: Oneta Buice, Sid Cole, Ina Ruth Garrison, Mary Marney. 
Bottom Row: John Rentfro, Joe Bert Sissom, Eleanor Wright, John Yeaman. 
Not pictured: Nancy Medley, Muriel Wittbold. 



FORENSIC CLUB 



The Forensic Club is composed of students interested in the ora- 
torical elements of speech, such as debate, after-dinner speaking, 
poetry-reading, declamating, and so on. 

With the able direction and enthusiasm of sponsor Sam Raines, 
Forensic members were able to bring home several trophies from 
speech meets this year. 

Although it is a young club, great interest has been shown, and 
we of Southwestern are looking for even more honors in their field in 
the years to come. 



BOB MESSER ETHEL TROUT 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY 



First Row: Richard Brahm, Gray Brucks, Harold Bulgerin, Coleen Camp, Mrs. Alma Coats, George Daw- 
son, Paul DeWoody, Helen Durrenburger. 

Second Row: C. N. Forsvalh John Foster, Jean Anne Giddings, Bob Gunther, Byron Griffin, Johnnie Faye 
Lyons, Mac MacAllister, Jimmy McClendon. 

Third Row: Bob Messer, Gil Morrison, Bill Rankin, Don Stonecipher, Barbara Sneed, Phyllis Trahan, Frankie 
Vaughn. 

Not pictured: Jean Cameron, Jimmy Snoga. 



SOUTHWESTERN PRE-MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENT: BYRON GRIFFIN 
VICE-PRESIDENT: PAUL DE WOODY 
SECRETARY-TREASURER: JEAN ANNE GIDDINGS 



The Pre-Medical Association is an organization for students who are preparing 
to enter the medical profession. Its purpose is to further interest in the practical 
aspect of pre-med study, to add to and broaden the study of pre-med, and to acquaint 
students with branches of the profession, methods, and leading members of the 
profession. 



133 



First Row: Dan Alberg, Ruth Anderegg, Richard Brahm, George Brigham, Harold Bulgerin, George 
Dawson. 

Second Row: Paul DeWoody, Jean Anne Giddings, Margaret Glendenning, Gradylene Jordan, Roy Luton- 
sky, Bob Massey. 

Third Row: Bob Messer, Guy Pry, Paul Rader, Louis Reed, John Paul Schultze, Duane Sterns. 
Fourth Row: Joyce Terry, Harold Treibs, Mary Lynn Webb, Wilbur Wood, Don Wolfe. 
Not pictured: James McClendon, Matt Dees, Jimmy Snoga, Ralph Russell. 



The Southwestern Science Society is an organization of advanced students who have achieved certain 
scholarship qualifications. One advanced course in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geology, or Mathematics is 
required, and a second course in one of these subjects must be in progress. 

The Society was organized in 1918 by Dr. J. C. Godbey; the original organization being called the South- 
western Chemical Society. In 1926 Biology and Physics joined the organization and it became known as the 
Southwestern Science Society. Mathematics was included later and during the war (1942-43) Geology was also 
included. 

The purpose of the society is the promotion of the scientific spirit in the lives of individuals. Regular 
monthly meetings are held for programs and business. The society is active locally, and also attempts advance- 
ment of science in the State. 




PRESIDENT: JIMMY SNOGA 

VICE-PRESIDENT, BIOLOGY: RICHARD BRAHM 
VICE-PRESIDENT, CHEMISTRY: LOUIS REED 
VICE-PRESIDENT, GEOLOGY: BOB MASSEY 
VICE-PRESIDENT, MATHEMATICS: JOYCE TERRY 
VICE-PRESIDENT, PHYSICS: PAUL RADER 
SECRETARY-TREASURER: RUTH ANDEREGG 



FALL SEMESTER 



SPRING SEMESTER 




FALL 

SECRETARY-TREASURER: JOHN CHARLES 
HISTORIAN: DON LEE 
REPORTER: TOM TOLEMAN 
PLACEMENT RUREAU: HENRY DESCHNER 



SPRING 

SECRETARY-TREASURER: FRED GUFFY 
HISTORIAN: RILL HARMON 
REPORTER: ROBERT KIRK 

PLACEMENT RUREAU: LAURENCE CESMIROSKY 



The Lithadelphic Society is an organization of Geology students. Its aim is to create a 
practical interest in the study of Geology, enhance scholarship standards of Geology stu- 
dents, and open the study of Geology to all who may be interested. This organization is one 
of the newest on the campus, but it is rapidly proving its worth. Already more students are 
becoming interested in the study of Geology, and the Lithadelphic will soon be well-known to 
everyone. 



Laurence Cesmirosky 



Fred Guffy 



Robert Kirk 



Tom Toleman Frankie Vaughn Odell Wooten 



Top Row: Margie Bowen, Elaine Broadwell, Dot Clark, Betty Crump, Gloria Diltz. 

Bottom Row: Alice Hallauer, Jo Mayfield, Marilyn Roberson,' Jimmie Robinett, Ina Sutherland. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE CLUB 




m DORIS ANN BROWN LOLA McGAUGHEY 

Formerly the P. E. Club, it was reorganized this year and PRESIDENT SECRETARY 

renamed the Physical Culture Club. Its purpose is to de- 
velop interest in health and sports, and to further skill in 
playing and calling games. 

Not pictured: Sallye Tom Smith, Vice-President 

The big annual event is the spring picnic held at San 
Gabriel Park. D. A. fixed the potato salad (Home Ec. 
major) and the girls roasted their own weinies and put 
barbecue sauce over them. Hmmmmm, good!!! 

The club is composed primarily of girls majoring or minor- 
ing in Physical Education, but any interested are urged 
to join. The sponsor of the club is Mrs. Rosemary Galyen. 



136 



First Row: Martha Bickley, Sue Boehm, Janette Bowmer, Pat Brazil, Doris Ann Brown, Brucene Cox, Pat Crow. 
Second Row: Barbara Dunn, Joann Evans, Ann Hasse, Alice Henderson, Alicia Hodges, Barbara Horn, Beryl Kenneth. 
Third Row: Camilla Lanham, Ruth McCain, Kay McKinney, Lois Muckleroy, Marilee Munger, Barbara Gratz Parmlee, Elizabeth 
Peters. 

Fourth Row: Roberta Reed, Jimmie Robinett, Wynona Terry, Phyllis Trahan, Sally Vaughn, Eva Jo Williams, Margaret Winfrey. 
Not pictured: Ina Sutherland, Pat Traylor, Frances McCleskey, Josephine Roberts, Beth Worth. 



HOME 




PRESIDENT: DORIS ANN BROWN 
VICE-PRESIDENT: RUTH McCAIN 
SECRETARY: JOANN EVANS 



TREASURER: NILA MAE MANER 



The Home Economics Club is an organization of girls especially interested in this field. Composed pri- 
marily of Home Economics students, it is, however, open to all girls who may wish to join. The club is both 
educational and social. At regular meetings talks by the girls themselves or special speakers deal with prob- 
lems relating to the homemaking field. The purpose of the club is to increase interest in the study of home 
management, child care and development, and other similar problems. Also it provides stimulation of practical 
and social study of Home Economics. The club is one of the most enthusiastic on the campus. 



This year Ruth McCain was elected as the ideal girl by the club. This is an honor which was bestowed 
the first time this year, and will continue to be a custom from now on. 



137 




PUTlIWISTEra 



MAGAZINE 



GILLETTE SHEPPARD 

Editor 



fc Wpt?.. c - -Dirt . 



0/7) 



ttl . ther e was a little freshman. He 
Once upon a time there was the great 

was such a teeny weeny " ttought he was a 

big school where he •""^^ very first 
very significant somebody, so lr ™ Wno would 

day of the Fall Semester he was ^ head of 

have dreamed what big idea f we "^ 1 genlfrs were such 
such a SMALL P^f^*! forever walked with their 
grand personages that they lorev that 
feads "high in the clouds and did they^ 
there was anyo ne on alraost seniors so 

Freshman? No. TheJ' unio clouds ^t22 

they walked with their heads on a . 

and did THEY know there was W™ c p Tne s 
litt^ Fres taan oa th lr campus T ^ 
mores were no long er ^ but unless 

hardly ever l° oked ^"^Sophomores know the 
down their noses Di the >Sop on 

r it UtUe Freshman was all alo 

- Then^fn/day-, the littl. ^ ^deci 
would do something big in his s chooi ^ 
them all take "^°/ he reaUy was. He wo 

h w ^^r;! 1 ;:,;!, from the 

respect Jj^ BfcLiration foom all th 

be for him! 
iould be sung 
,er at the 

t could 
in hims 
run for 
ie, or 
with 
was, h 
•nd. I 
to sej 
,he cour 
Ls fell 
, a ..t as he) to the 
F-and the Vice-Presidency of 
Secretaryship of his language 



The little 
Freshman 





..HENRY 



om 

:? 

done 



No 



hman 



, ip of his fraternity! He 
ery proud. In no time at 
^ch office and others >« 
I and they granted him new 
ke d harder and they gave 
fact, he found, before 
rked the more work he had 
-.ed, was the future in that 
The little Freshman became he 
d He won no respect from e 
t the Juniors and no great 
the Sophomores. Did any 
.- except when it was 
Then they knew upon 
the little Freshman. 

rared not for working 
man careu MVP 

° rMs %%-&K 
Jrythip a'nd he abdicated from 
M at school looked hope- 

«»= — ■ rrrs— !t far as he was concerned. The 

iessly ™« OT T^nT»*lV -with their heads high in 

sa«Sg^a sssa sirs 

"What am I going to doc 

Crl In d d at that ^^^^^2^ 
god mother appeared and waved^ ^ sky ln the 

B o S m h i e n g d 'anf burned with ^ - n<11 d e- 
»l know what I'll do! he _ ex^ str aight a's 

vote all my time to my studies and^ frQo 
in school, and then I will ^in hign ^ great BI G 
Seniors, ?he Sopho-ores. How fool- 

bunches of ad mlration^i ^ before! 




W "> t£fa,l^; ^Hl* j^vT> : 



wal 

f( 
it 
S 



ish I 
So, 
midnigh 
much bi 
was no c 
from the 
Freshman 
the lit 
labor ov 
and Fun 
died so 
dining 
off the 
would e< 
nearing 
top grs 
much gl 



as 



the 



Sophoi 



SdUvUal Staff 



EDITOR GILLETT SHEPPARD 

ASSISTANT EDITOR BETTY McCOY 

ART EDITOR PARKER FOLSE 

EXCHANGE EDITOR ANN WALKER 

HUMOR EDITOR LARRY CROWNOVER 

BUSINESS MANAGER HARVEY Mc DONALD 

SPONSORS EUNICE CLAIRE GEPPERT 

JAMES FLOYD VALONE 

FEATURE WRITERS THOMAS TOLEMAN 

HENRY RIEMFNSCHNFIDER 
FREDERICK E. GAUPP 



138 



THE MEGAPHONE 



STAFF 

Editor Fred Switzer 

Associate Editor Blitz Griffin 

Student Business Manager Melvin Birklebach 

Sports Editor J° e Cavness 

Girls Sports Martha Butler 

Society Editor M° rlee Baker 

Feature Editor J° hn Cardwell 

Cartoonist Parker Folse, Watt Winn 

Photographer Har P er McGee 

Staff Writers: 

Leslie Boone, Maryneal Jackson, Joyce Terry, Mary Marney, 
Peter Gaupp, Charles Sinclair, Joe Bert Sissom, and Syd Cole 

Business Manager M - Howard Knox 

Sponsor Angus Springer 




FRED SWITZER 
EDITOR 



The Megaphone is a weekly student publication containing news and views of current interest to students and faculty. It is 
run entirely on a non-profit basis by students interested in journalism. Not only does it deal with local news but also state, 
national, and international news. Ex-students keep in touch with campus activities via the Megaphone, and Southwestern students 
wait eagerly for Wednesday morning and the Megaphone. 

Congratulations and much gratitude go to the editor for a grand job well done. 




THE SOU'WESTER 



An annual is a storehouse full of treasures, memories of a school 
year crowded with events that one wishes to keep with him always, to be 
reminded of wistfully as he turns through the recorded pages of time. 



STAFF 

Editor: Parker Folse 

Associate Editor: Marlee Baker 

Photographers: 

Lee Karr, Harper McGee, Carl Bergquist 

Freshman Editor: Margaret Winfrey 

Sophomore Editor: Loretta Davis 

Junior Editors: 

Alice Henderson and Gloria Avant 

Senior Editor: Preston Darland 

Sports Editors: 

Henry Sheppard and Blitz Griffin 

Campus Life Editor: Fred Switzer 

Advertising Editor: Melvin Birkelbach 

Staff Members: Camilla Lanham, Elaine 
Broadwell, Marilyn Wheeler, Sammie 
McLelland, Gretchen Becker, Phyllis 
Reese, Marilyn Roberson, Virginia Ruth 
Bryan, Geraldine Luter, Betty Lenge- 
feld, Bobby Hayes, Clara Jo Dyche, 
Elaine Wagner, Carrie Jo Mitchell. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Elizabeth Fox 
Art work done by Parker Folse. 



Standing: Carrie Jo Mitchell, Marilyn Wheeler, Henry Sheppard, Phyllis Reese, Clara Jo Dyehe. 
Seated: Camilla Lanham, Parker Folse, Marlee Baker. 



139 



COACHES 






Shown at left are the Southwestern Coaching 
Staff with Trainer Shelley Smith. 

The coaches are, left to right, Assistant Coach 
W. O. Pottenger, Head Coach Spot Collins, 
Trainer Smith, and End Coach Ted Bare. 

Coach Collins is a native of Breckenridge and 
is a graduate of the University of Texas where 
he was a star guard and blocking back. He is 
a Marine Corps veteran. 

Coach Pottenger came to Southwestern in 
1949 from Carthage, Missouri, Hi School where 
he had coached for 2 years. Pottenger is a 
graduate of Southwest Missouri Teachers Col- 
lege. 

Coach Ted Bare is a recent Southwestern 
graduate and all-time S.U. gridiron great. He 
lettered three years at Southwestern as an end 
and was an outstanding basketball player. 



19-F00TBALL-49 



CAPTAINS 



In the photo at right, are the 1949 South- 
western football captains, Center Henry F. Shep- 
pard at left, and Halfback Joe Dowdy Frazer 
at right. 

Sheppard is a three-year letterman while 
Frazer has lettered two years. 

Both boys were seniors in 1949, and Sheppard 
is from Cuero, Texas, while Frazer is from San 
Antonio. 





Bill Springfield 
3-Year Letterman End 




Henry Sheppard 
3-Year Letterman Center 




Curtis Ledbetter 
3- Year Letterman End 



MM 



71 



V 



Bobby Koenig 
3-Year Letterman Tackle 



FOOTBALL SEASON 1949 

Following Southwestern' s strong showing in 
1948 with a comparatively green team winning 
6 out of 9 games, pre-season dope for 1949 
had Southwestern picked to finish high in Texas 
Conference standings. 

However, it was only after the Buccaneers 
spent the first 8 games of their 10 tilt schedule 
floundering around and winning only two non- 
conference starts while dropping 3 straight in 
conference play that they finally came to life; 
against A&I at Homecoming. 

A complete account of the full season follows. 




Marvin Gray 
3- Year Letterman Back 




S.U. — S'WEST TEXAS 

1949's opening encounter matched the Pirates 
with the Southwest Texas State Bobcats, 1948 
winners of the Lone Star Conference. Although 
the game ended in a nothing to nothing score, 
Southwestern backers felt that their club had 
played well for a season opener. The Pirates 
blew two good scoring chances, while holding 
the Cats almost gainless. 



S.U. — SAM HOUSTON STATE 6 

In the young season's second tilt, the Pirates 
met the Sam Houston Bearcats in Huntsville. 
The Cats had not previously won a game in 
12 starts, but aided by inept Southwestern play, 
and the sterling performance of Little All Amer- 
ica end Roughhouse Williams collected a one 
touchdown lead and were not to be overtaken. 




Dewey Baker 
3- Year Letterman Back 




143 



Bobby Aderhold 
3- Year Letterman Guard 





Glen T. Swenson 
2- Year Letterman Guard 




Buddy Lawhorn 
2- Year Letterman Guard 





in* 



Wendell Graves 
2- Year Letterman Tackle 



FOOTBALL 

S.U. — LOUISIANA TECH 20 

A week after the Sam Houston game, the 
Pirates, still on the road, traveled to Ruston, La., 
to meet the very strong Lousiana Tech club. 
The Webfeet sported the classiest running and 
passing game that the Southwesterners faced 
all season, and ran away with a game that 
was hardly a contest after the first half. 

S.U. 10 — ABILENE CHRISTIAN 13 

In their first conference start of the year, the 
Bucs met the ACC Wildcats in Abilene. The 
Wildcats, always tough on their home field, 
proved too much for a game group of Pirates. 

However, the first half was all Southwestern 
as the Pirates seemed destined to start the come- 
back trail. They tallied their first two scores of 
the year that first half, a field goal, and touch- 
down, to lead 10-0. 

But not to be denied in the fatal second half, 
the Wildcats roared back to score two quick 
game-winning touchdowns. 

S.U. 28 — DANIEL BAKER 

Returning to home soil fine following week, 
the Pirates shellacked the out-manned Daniel 
Baker Hillbillies 28-0. The Billies were never 
in the game, and with this win, Southwestern 
supporters hoped for a continued winning 
streak. 

S.U. 7 — HOWARD PAYNE 20 

Southwestern met strong Howard Payne in 
Brownwood the next Saturday, and came home 
on the short end of a 20-7 score. This was the 
Pirates' second consecutive conference loss, and 
was marred by apparently disinterested Buc 
play. Only redeeming feature of the tilt for 
S.U. partisans was a brief period in the second 



Robert Castanon 
2- Year Letterman Tackle 




35 



Frank White 
2- Year Letterman Back 





Buddy Frey 
2- Year Letterman Guard 



144 



Bobby Adair 
2- Year Letterman Back 




Dolphus Saegert 
2- Year Letterman Tackle 




Jim Fenwick 
2- Year Letterman Back 





Joe Dowdy Frazer 
2- Year Letterman Back 



FOOTBALL 

half, when Marvin Gray and Leo Chafin entered 
the game to spark the Southwesterner's touch- 
down drive". 

S.U. 6 — EAST TEXAS BAPTIST 20 

The Howard Payne defeat seemed to break 
the Pirates' back and they returned to Snyder 
field to hit rock bottom against the Baptists in 
a listless two-touchdown defeat. 

S.U. — AUSTIN COLLEGE 28 

In this one played in Sherman, the Bucs took 
their most outscored loss of the year. Appar- 
ently stunned by the East Texas defeat they 
were completely outplayed. Austin College's 
flying circus was too much for the Pirate sec- 
ondary, and when the Bucs pulled linemen into 
the backfield in a vain attempt to break up the 
passing game, Austin College backs literally 
paraded through gaping holes in the line. 

S.U. 3 — A&I 7 

Bouncing back at Homecoming, when they 
seemed down for the long count, the Pirates al- 
most took this one out of the fire on the strength 
of a second quarter field goal into a strong north 
wind, with Frank White doing the booting. 

During the last quarter the Javelinas began a 
desperation passing game. An almost unavoid- 
able interference penalty ruled against the 
Southwestern secondary gave the visitors the 
ball on the one-yard line and they scored on the 
next play, then added an extra point to end 
the scoring. 

S.U. 20 — McMURRY 20 

This tie is for the record books. In the final 
regularly scheduled game of the year, South- 




Kelley Burkhardt 
1-Year Letterman Back 




Larry Crownover 
1-Year Letterman Back 





John Paul Schulze 
2- Year Letterman End 



145 



Hobert Simmons 
1-Year Letterman Back 







Floyd Pearson 
1-Year Letterman Back 




Jack Dancer 
1-Year Letterman Center 




57 




Gene White 
2- Year Letterman Center 





Jake Shelley 
1-Year Letterman Back 



FOOTBALL 

western met the mighty McMurry Indians on 
Georgetown's Snyder Field. The Indians, al- 
ready Conference Champions, boasted three 
potential Little All Americans in halfback Brad 
Rowland, fullback Floyd Sampson, and giant 
end Les Cowan. Halfback Marvin Gray of the 
Pirates stole the night's show, however, as he 
personally led the Bucs to their tie. South- 
western spotted McMurry 14 points before they 
ever started a scoring drive, but Gray's slash- 
ing, driving, running, and outstanding passing, 
plus the goal-line drive of Kelley Burkhardt 
brought the Pirates back into the game and 
enabled them to tie 20-20. 

S.U. 47 — MEXICO CITY COLLEGE 6 

Invited to play a post-season game against 
the Mexico City College Aztecs, the Champions 
of all Mexico, the Bucs traveled all the way to 
Mexico City, as guests of the Aztecs and re- 
turned hospitality by shellacking the Mexican 
team 47-6. 

S.U. 20 — AUSTIN EXES 7 

For a season finale, the Pirates were invited 
to play a team made up of ex-Austin Hi grid- 
sters in Austin's House park. The Austin club 
developed into both art ex-Maroon and ex- 
University of Texas club, while Southwestern 
enlisted the services of coaches Collins, Bare, 
and Pottenger. 

The game was played in a sea of mud, left 
after heavy fall rains, but was an interesting 
encounter with all three S.U. coaches and half- 
back Leo Chafin adding up to the margin of 
difference. 




Leo Chafin 
1-Year Letterman Back 




81 



Kenneth Adkins 
1-Year Letterman End 




146 



Lawrence Cowley 
1-Year Letterman End 




Carlton Massey 
1-Year Letterman End 



Charles Sehoen 
1-Year Squad 



147 



BASEBALL 1950 




Southwestern University's 1950 baseball team which has won 10 games while losing 4. Two more games are left on 
the schedule. 

Players shown include, top row: Walter Peterson, James Galbreath, Paul Rader, Carlton Massey, Donald Penning- 
ton, Mark Thomas, Herman Humble, and Dick Hays. Bottom row: Gene Wood, Wendell Graves, Don Byerly, Bill Breed, 
Frank Severn, Jake Shelley, Hop Priest, and Lawrence Powell. Not shown are Coach Spot Collins, third baseman Buddy 
Priest, and second baseman Myron Dees. 




The Pirates' first line hurlers, Hop Priest (3-3), left, Dan Byerly (4-0), center, and Frank Severn (3-1), at right. 
All three have been steady performers, but the veteran 4-year letterman Hop Priest, tossed the gem of the year, a spark- 
ling two-hitter against St. Mary's University of San Antonio. 



148 




Paul Rader 
Letterman, 2nd Base 




Jake Shelley 
Letterman Catcher 



PIRATES 1950 RECORD 

Opponents S.U. 

Hardin Simmons 3 2 

Hardin Simmons 8 9 

Texas Lutheran 10 25 

Texas Lutheran 7 8 

St. Edwards 9 8 

St. Edwards 5 6 

St. Mary's 7 5 

St. Mary's 5 7 

St. Mary's 2 8 

S'West Texas 9 

S'West Texas 2 3 

S'West Texas 4 11 

S'East Okla. 3 9 

Brook Med. 5 4 



Mark Thomas 
1st Base 



■ 



Bill Breed 
2nd Base 




Ray Marek 
Shortstop 



r 



Carlton Massey 
Catcher 




Gene Wood 
Letterman, Outfield 




Herman Humble 
Letterman, Outfield 




Lawrence Powell 
Outfield 




Coach Spot Collins handles all infield workouts himself, 
and here hits out ground balls. 




Don Pennington Wendell Graves 

Pitcher Catcher 



TRACK 



1950 




Peeping over the girls' heads are Boh Douglas, Lee Folse, and Don 
Stockton. The girls are Ann Walker, Virginia Spencer, and Sallye 
Tom Smith. 



TENNIS 1950 




The Southwestern tennis team is shown with Coach W. O. Pottenger. In the usual order, players include: 
John Cardwell, David Cardwell, Dick Moon, Matt Dees, and Dick Blevins. 




What a bundle of cheer in one picture! 
152 From left to right are Bob Douglas, Ann Walker, Don Stockton, Virginia Spencer, Sallye Tom Smith, and 

Lee Folse. 



INTRAMURALS 



MEN 




PI Li FOOTBALL 



Pictured on the left 
are T o uc h Football 
Champions. They com- 
pleted their third year of 
intramural football un- 
defeated and untied save 
for one game with the 
Ind. "B," 0-0. 



Bottom row, 1. to r.: Willis Kelley, Sam Michaels, Dan Parmalee, Capt, Eldon Mays 
Top row: Earl Nelson, John Dibrell, Daudy Priest, Aubrey Boozer. 



INDEPENDENT GLOBE 
SPOTTERS BASKET 
BALL CHAMPS 



Pictured to the right 
are members of the 
Independent Globespot- 
ters team that won the 
intramural basketball 
championship. 

They completed the 
season unbeaten and un- 
tied. 




Bottom row, I. to r.: Leo Chafin, Dave Schulze, Jake Shelley, Lawrence Cowley. 
Top row: Lawrence Powell, Gilbert Castanon, BobCastanon. 



153 




INDEPENDENT GLOBE 
SPOTTERS BASEBALL TEAM 

Pictured on the left are 
members of the Globespot- 
ters baseball team, winners 
of the first round robin. 
If the team is successful 
in the tournament to be 
played following the round 
robin, they will be the win- 
ners of the intramural ath- 
letic trophy due to their 
winning in both basketball 
and baseball. 

The team was not de- 
feated nor tied. 




Bottom row, 1. to r.: Gene Davenport, Bob Castanon, Joe Edwards, Johnny Myers. 

Top Row: Leslie West, Gilbert Castanon, Red Simmons, John Paul Schulze, Lawrence Cowley. 



GIRLS 



TBI BELT BASKETBALL TEAM 

Pictured on the right are members of the Tri Delt 
basketball team that completed the season untied and 
undefeated, making them basketball champions. 

The team turned in one of the best games of the 
season when they successfully edged a strong Barb 
team by a two-point margin in the last seconds of 
play. Their teamwork and long shot success brought 
them the nod, their last-half rally paying off with a 
win and the championship. 

L. to r., bottom row: Kay McKinney, Sally Tom 
Smith, Doris Ann Brown, Joan Corwin. 

Top row: Ann Walker, Frances Melton, Virginia 
Hasse, Betty Crump, Capt. 



154 





INDEPENDENT VOLLEY BALL 
CHAMPIONS 

Pictured on the left are members of the Independent 
volley ball team that won the volley ball champion- 
ship by turning in a no loss, no tie record. 

Taking advantage of good serving, the team evi- 
denced a team work pattern that did much to put 
them in the championship slot. 

Bottom row, 1. to. r.: Norma Jo Mayfield, Gloria 
Chamberlain, Martha Butler, Capt, Lola McGaughey. 

Top row: Shirley Davis, Anna Jean Godbey, Helen 
Bartak, Elaine LeBlond, Mildred Willmann, Windy 
Steinman, June Ashen. 



INDEPENDENT BASE 
BALL TEAM 

Pictured on the right are mem- 
bers of the Independent baseball 
team that was leading scorer at 
press time. Based on the first 
two games that time permitted 
to be tabulated before the last 
deadline passed, the Barbs had 
amassed more than twice the 
amount of points of their closest 
rival, the A. D. Pi's. The Barbs 
scored 50 runs while allowing 4 
as compared to only 23 runs by 
the A.D.Pi's who allowed 9 
scores by their opponents. 

If the Independents maintain 
their lead for the remainder of 
the baseball season, they will win 
the intramural trophy by virtue 
of winning both the volley ball 
and baseball tournaments. 




Bottom row, 1. to r.: Elaine LeBlond, Martha Butler, Capt., Anna Jean Godbey, June 
Ashen. 

Top row: Norma Jo Mayfield, Windy Steinman, Shirley Davis, Betty Wilson, Mildred 
Willmann, Darlene Brucks. 




The Ad Building and D. A. — one 
a landmark, and the other almost a 
tradition in herself! 

D. A., of the friendly smile, the 
genuine winning personality, and 
the ever-present willingness to help 
others. 

Southwestern is the better for her, 
and she has left an example in living 
that should well be followed. 



MISS 
SOUTHWESTERN 



Miss Southwestern - the highest honor that can come 
to any girl here at Southwestern University. She embodies 
all the ideals which the school holds for all its young 
women. She possesses strength of character, stands for 
Christian principles, has better-than-average scholastic 
standing, is active in all phases of campus life, and perhaps 
most important of all, is loved and respected by the faculty 
and by her fellow students. 

Here Doris Ann Brown, our Miss Southwestern, clad in 
the traditional white dress, gold mantle, and carrying 
yellow roses, all symbolical of the high honor she has 
attained, is crowned by Dr. William C. Finch, president. 

Prince Parker Folse, in the background, watches the cere- 
mony. 




160 



ALPHA DELTA PI BEAUTY 

MISS JOAN DEE QUINN 




INDEPENDENT BEAUTY 

MISS JOYCE PEACOCK 




165 




J ZETA TALI ALPHA BEAUTY 

MISS BOYCE ANN LEWIS 



166 







ELLA BLANKENSHIP 
Independent 



GRAY BRUCKS 
Independent 



KATHY BURTON 
Independent 





BETTYE CURTIS 
Delta Zeta 



BEAUTY 
KOMI HE E S 



DOT CLARK 
Delta Delta Delta 





CAMILLA LANHAM ANNA LEUTWYLER 

Delta Delta Delta Zeta Tau Alpha 



168 




RUTH McCAIN 
Phi Mu 




LOIS MUCKLERO"* 
Alpha Delta Pi 



LOIS RUTLEDCE 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

169 




170 



YVONNE WILSON 
Alpha Delta Pi 



BETH WORTH 
Delta Zeta 



BEAUTY REVUE 



The beauties of Southwestern University were nominated 
by the fraternities, sororities, and the Independent Organiza- 
tion. The nominees were judged in the Library Auditorium 
by State Representative Peppy Blount, Walter (Booster) Bre- 
mond, and Bob Phillips; following the judging a reception 
was held in the library foyer. 

The beauties were presented on Saturday night in the 
colorful Southwestern Variety Show and Beauty Revue spon- 
sored by the annual. Peppy Blount emceed the two-hour pro- 
gram which included skits from various organizations; the 
evening was livened hilariously by Peppy's impromptu com- 
ments. 

The presentation of the chosen beauties climaxed one of 
the most eventful programs of the year. 



Proud thanks are due the preceding 
beauties for their cooperation. 



171 



Another year has passed and between its coming and going many occurrences of international, national, 
state, and local significance have taken place. In many parts of the world strife and conflict have run their 
course, new discoveries and inventions which can bring life or death have made their appearance, men have lived 
and men have died, and this old planet on which we live has continued on its whirling course through space. 
For many this year at Southwestern has been a happy one so why don't we turn back the pages of time, say to 
September of 1949, and catch a brief glimpse of the happenings on our campus, events which stand out to us 
during the past year. 

What freshman can ever forget his first look at the Administration Building (above) with its strong, time- 
defying look of solidity. Little did he know that soon, within those weatherworn walls, he would be racking his 
brain, seeking the right answers to the many questions which his teachers were asking. But, such is life. He or 
she was happy. At last he was through with high school and now he could settle down to the glorious, care- 
free life of a college man or woman. 



Do you remember the Freshman Party, with its sing- 
song and Mr. Springer's humorous readings, or Registra- 
tion Day, with its cards, forms, rain, and lines, lines, lines. 
First you had to go here, then someone sent you there, 
and just about every place you went — someone got there 
ahead of you. It's kinda hard to forget, isn't it. 



Cardinal Key and Blue Key supplied information of 
various types to the bewildered freshmen and others who 
needed it on R-day. Fred Switzer is seen (right) handing 
out seniorly advice to Melanie Williams while Jerry 
Hardin is debating whether or not it is the right info. 




Will it never end? That seems to be the 
general consensus of opinion as Ted Bare, 
Mrs. Geppert, Dean Ferguson, Dr. Burton, 
Miss Taylor, Dr. Patterson, etc., all keep sign- 
ing students up. Barbara Dunn looks as if 
she is about ready to give up and go home. 



A few days later came the annual Faculty Reception. 
All the boys and girls put on their best bib and tucker, 
formed lines again, and started to become acquainted 
with the members of the faculty and each other. The 
young ladies sure looked mighty pretty in their dress-up 
clothes and a good time was had by all. 



The fabulous, sleep-losing "Rush Week" came round 
and the rush was truly on. The frosh were wined, dined, 
and entertained like mad. They really enjoyed it. But 
the worn-out upperclassmen who gave the parties en- 
joyed sleeping most of all. At right, the PIKAs' are 
giving Dick Thomas the full treatment while at lower 
right the Kappa Sigs are putting on a show for the 
people. 




Above are shown some of the Cuties who were present 
at the ZTA rush party. They include Boyce Ann Lewis, 
Joan Dee Quinn, Jean Ann Pledger, Jill Taylor, and Ann 
Leeman. 




At top right are shown ADPI's Betty McCoy and 
Jane B. McCook with rushees Alta Naylor and Martha 
Holland. Just look at all those pretty Pepsodent smiles. 




At lower right the boys of Kappa Alpha give out with 
a big grin for the photographer (Harper McGee, no 
doubt). The rushees are Syd Cole and Hyman Fortin- 
berry and Frank Severn, Bill Higgins, Buddy Lawhorn, 
Harold Leatherwood, Paul Baker, Marvin Gray, Charlie 
Guinn, Slim Avant, and Lee Folse. 




With the beginning of school and the advent of Fall, the students of Southwestern naturally got the 
fever — Football Fever, that is. The Black and Gold fielded a good, strong team and the spirit and enthusiasm 
ran high. However, as fate sometime wills, a combination of hard luck, bad breaks, and other factors added 
up to a losing football team, and with the loses the spirit of the supporters waned. Then Old Dame Fortune 
and a fighting spirit began to assert themselves and the Pirate Footballers fought the powerful Texas A and I 

Javalinas to a standstill in a fine Homecoming Game 
before being edged by the score of 7 to 3. The following 
week the Pirates really came into their own and closed 
out the season successfully by going into the McMurry 
. game as 50-point underdogs and coming out with a 

: 20-20 tie. 




Shown above are two Pirates very successfully apply- 
ing a "tight squeeze" to a Javalina in the A. and I. 
game, with two more Bucs rushing up to give some aid 
which wasn't needed. 

From all those anxious faces at right it would seem 
that the pressure is on the Pirate goal-line, although 
Beryl Kermeth seems to be more interested in food at 
the moment. 




At left, Coach "Spot" Collins and some of the boys 
are really concentrating on the gridiron. Gene White, 
Frank White, "Pooch" Pearson, and Terrell Allen look 
a little worried. In fact, Terrell looks like he's just 
about ready to chew off a finger. It's possible, though, 
that he had blueberry pie for supper and is still trying 
to get rid of the seeds. 





At left — Mrs. J. N. R. Score is 
shown turning over the first spadeful 
of dirt at the Lois Craddock Perkins 
Chapel ground-breaking ceremonies. 

Right — Dr. W. C. Finch, then ad- 
ministrative Assistant and now Presi- 
dent of the University, takes his turn 
with the spade. 

Lower right — Jake Shelley, Stu- 
dent Body president, lifts his quota 
of dirt, to be followed by members 
of the student body organizations 
and the campus leaders. 




In October of 1949 an event occurred on the campus 
which will long be remembered, for it was on this day 
that the students of Southwestern University wended 
their way to a spot behind the old Science Building and 
there participated in the ground-breaking ceremonies for 
the Lois Craddock Perkins Chapel. This momentous 
event was the first step in the plans for a Greater 
Southwestern. 

Presiding over the gathering was Administrative As- 
sistant Dr. William C. Finch. Mrs. J. N. R. Score, repre- 
senting Dr. Score, turned over the first shovelful of 
dirt and was followed in this happy task by members 
of the faculty and representatives of the various student 
body organizations. 

The University A Cappella Choir lent the impressive- 
ness of its collective voices to the proceedings and the 
solemnity and beauty of the program made it a day 
which will not soon be forgotten. ' 





An unidentified hand points toward Parker 
Folse, who played the title role in the Players' 
production of "Julius Caesar." Fred Switzer 
backs him up as Marc Anthony. 




One of S.U.'s finest character actresses, Ruth 
Lewis, is shown givinq Winona Terry some sound 
advice in the play, "The Late Christopher Bean," 
which was presented in the "Theatre-in-the- 
Round." 



At right, a scene from 
the Mask and Wig pro- 
duction of "The Late 
Christopher Bean," with 
Geraldine Luter and Fred 
Switzer looking on as Ed- 
die Silliman examines a 
picture. 




The drama lovers of the University can probably remember these 
scenes from two of the productions of Angus Springer's Mask and 
Wig Players for the '49-'50 season. First came "The Late Chris- 
topher Bean," which was followed by W. Shakespeare's "Julius 
Caesar." Next on the agenda came R. B. Sheridan's famous 
comedy, "The Rivals," presented in the theatre-in-the-round. The 
finale of the season was a presentation of the Broadway hit, "The 
Heiress," which was one of the best productions seen on the South- 
western stage in a long time. 

The annual best acting awards for the year, presented by Mr. 
Springer, went to Ruth Lewis, Clara Mae Blocksom, Nancy Medley, 
Jerry Hardin, Fred Switzer, and John McClish. 



Below is another scene from the Mask and Wig Play- 
ers' presentation of "Julius Caesar." Shown around the 
body of Brutus (Norman Wahl) are John Wiggins, Joe 
Bert Sissom, Fred Switzer, and Bill Campbell. 




is running short, so a brief summary of the major events from Homecoming to 
graduation must, of necessity, ensue. In November eleven seniors of the university 
were named to Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges, Cardinal and Blue Key elected 10 stu- 
dents to their membership, the Attorney General of Texas, Trice Daniels, spoke to the student body, the 
Tirates rose from the depths to tie mighty McMurry 20-20, the Volleyball All-Stars handed the champion 
Tri-Delts a 33 to 19 licking and the Arts and Sciences faculty members battled it out with the Fine Arts 
faculty in a set-to of volleyball. 

In December, the Tirates journeyed to Mexico City and walloped the South of the Border gridders 47-6, 
several students went to Mineral Wells for the Texas Methodist Students Conference, the Southwestern 
Debate Team made a fine showing at the University of Texas Debate Festival, the traditional, beautiful 
Christmas Carol Service was held, under the direction of Dean Ferguson, and Christmas and New Year 
came, with a welcome vacation for all. 

In January Mr. McCoy and his Spanish students took a field trip to S.A., the Firate cagers started 
plaijmg in earnest, a name' was selected for the Megaphone gossip column, the Speech, Drama, and Journal- 
ism Departments held a Conference which was attended by students from several Texas high schools, Judg- 
ment Day (with one "e") arrived and final exams were held, Barbara Gratz and Dan Farmlee exchanged 
wedding vows, etc. 

In February Southwestern celebrated its 110th birthday, the all-school Variety Show and Beauty Revue 
was held, with Phyllis Taylor winning top beauty honors, and the Kappa Pliis celebrated Founders' Day. 

In March Dr. Eric W. Baker of London, England, delivered the third of the Willson Lectures, Charles 
Fromer, as usual, headed the Fall Distinction List, and five senior girls were nominated for Miss South- 
western, and D. A. Brown was elected in a run-off with Yvonne Wilson. 

In April came the "Mugafoam," the Lois Perkins Chapel continued its steady climb, Dr. Finch was 
elected President of the University, the baseball team was really going to town, Mary Lynn Webb won 
a Danforth Award, the Faculty -Senior Takeoff was a huge success, as was the Sadie Haivkins Dance, and 
Albert Gore, Kelly Burkhart, and Marlee Baker were elected to the top Student Associations for next year. 

In May Alpha Phi Omega, "The Heiress," and a "Fish story from Finch" came to the campus, the most 
successful "Weekend at College" and the coronation of Miss Southwestern were held, finals came and the 
1950 graduates received their diplomas, to bring a fine year to an end. 



HOME COMING 

The 1949 Homecoming was, according to everybody concerned, GREAT. 
The University Intermural Sing, The Goethe Celebration, the Bonfire and Pep 
Rally, the Homecoming Parade, the barbecue dinner, a wonderful football game, 
and a big Homecoming Dance all added up to a mighty fine time. A lot of 
credit should go to Mr. Knox and the Homecoming Committee for a job well 
done. Pictures on the two pages following will give you a good idea of the work 
and play which made this one of the best of all S.U. Homecomings. 




THE PARADE, FLOATS, WINNERS, AND STUFF 



Pictures of the Parade, and the Floats are shown above and on the following pages. The winners 
of the Homecoming events are: Poster Decorations — 1. Kappa Sigma, 2. Delta Delta Delta; House Decora- 
tions - 1. Phi Delta Theta, 2. Zeta Tau Alpha, 3. Alpha Delta Pi; Best Float in Homecoming Parade - 1. Phi 
Delta Theta, 2. Zeta Tau Alpha, 3. Delta Zeta; honorable mention - Alpha Delta Pi and Kappa Alpha; 
Intermural Sing - (Girls) - 1. Phi Mu, 2. Independents, 3. Delta Omicron; Intermural Sing - (Boys) - 
1. Independents, 2. Phi Delta Theta, 3. Kappa Sigma; Best Dressed Freshman in the Parade - Herbert 
Rohloff, Phi Delta pledge; Best Decorated Car -"Mrs. Cornwall's Little Angels," the Barracks "A" Boys. 



Kickoff in the Homecoming Game 
Pirates vs. Texas A. and I. Javalinas 




Right — The Phi Delt 
float in the "before" 
stage. 




Left — The Zeta Tau Alpha 
"Wishing Well" float in Home- 
coming Parade. 

Right — Half-time hilarities at 
the Homecoming game with the 
S.U. Marching Band and its lovely 
majorettes. 







"Hi 




Left — The First Prize-winning Phi Delta 
Theta float as it sails down the street, 
with Skippers Ann Walker and Lois Rut- 
ledge at the helm, during Homecoming 
Parade. 

Upper Right — The ADPi "Hog Heaven" 
float with a beautiful angel on top. 



182 




FOOTHALL 
QUEEN 




Upper Left — The Kappa Sigma float. 
Upper Right — The "Angels" of Barracks "A." 
Middle Left — Football Queen Joan Wood and 
her Court. 

Middle Right — Shenanigans at half-time in the 

Homecoming game. 
Lower Left — The Kappa Alpha float. 
Lower Right — The Delta Zeta float. 



183 



the -p^trom of lie 

r 

our 4<lvef User sr.... 



W. G. LDRD & CDMPANY 

AUTHORIZED 



PHONE 24D 




P. □. BOX 36 



J. B. MANNING, MGR. 

GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 




Palace Barber Shop 

BARTLEY, SOUTHWORTH 
AND 
RHODES 



Georgetown 



Texas 



EVERYTHING TO WEAR 
Nationally Known Lines 

HOFFMAN AND SON 

GEORGETOWN 




Miss Neas turns ground at the 
ceremonies beginning the new 
chapel. 



FOX-SCIIMIDT 

HEATING -:- PLUMBING -:- ELECTRIC 
SUPPLIES 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 

412 WEST 5th STREET 
PHONE 2-2435 



Bradford Paint Co. 

Wallpaper — Art Supplies 
Picture Framing — Fine Pictures 
Theatrical Make-up 

Free Parking Lot 

9th at Colorado 
Block South of Governor's Mansion 




The steel super -structure in the 
early stages of the Lois Perkins 
Chapel construction. 



Compliments of 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

1890- 1947 

Member F.D.l.C. 




Geraldine Luter does her stuff at 
what seems to be a lively Zeta 
rush party. 



SHELL FLORAL 
COMPANY 

For FLOWERS — Phone 177 
Georgetown 




Compliments of 

THE BELFORD LUMBER CO. 

BUILDING MATERIALS 

Telephone 34 Georgetown 



J. H. COMPTON 



C. T. BRAUN 




Compton Chevrolet Company 

914 Main Street — Phone 183 
GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 




The second -prize winning float of ZTA 
during the homecoming parade. 




L and M Cafe 

THE BIGGEST EITTEE PEACE FOR 
GOOD FOOD. OPEN 24 HOURS 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 

— Owners — 
Lessie Lou Cole — Minnie Kinsi 



r 




Some "kid stuff" pulled in the hot 
campaigning for Miss Southwestern. 



Compliments 



FREUND MOTOR COMPANY 

OLDSMOBILE - CADILLAC 
"Everything For Your Automobile" 
110-118 E. 7th St. Georgetown 




Higgins gives out with his intellectual 
look. 



In Passing Years . . . 

If you happen to glance over these words, may 
they bring back happy memories of 
"THE COKE DATE" at 

THE COOPER DRUG STORE 

Tommy Cooper 
WALGREEN AGENCY 




A lost point at the inter -faculty 
volley ball game. 



NEUMAN'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

718 Austin Avenue 
Georgetown Texas 



Compliments of 

CENTRAL BARBER SHOP 

Theo Denham John tiers 

Sven Crone 

Located on the South Side of the Square 



BEST WISHES OF 



C. C. HARRIS, MANAGER 



GEORGETOWN TEXAS 




cological elements. 



Compliments oj Jesse H. Jones 



BARNETT'S CAFE 



'Where Good Food Is Better" 



Georgetown, Texas 



Phone 150 




Real cider too. 



ENGV ALL-PETERSON, 



Florist 

608 E. 12th Street 

Georgetown, Texas 

Across the Street 
From Hospital 





If you think this is good food you 
should try one meal at Kuykendall. 



SERVING GEORGETOWN AND 
TRADE TERRITORY SINCE 1898 

THE FARMERS STATE BANK 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Georgetown 



Texas 




Dean Henry Meyer digs deep at 
ground-breaking ceremonies. 



GEORGETOWN 
AUTO SALES 



^1 



Phone 101 




The field house-need more be said, 




A 4 



Never Grumpy 
Always Friendly 



Customers locally and the nation over have found this 
bank's ser\ ice equally satisfactory in its completeness, 
jj/ efficiency and warm friendliness in serving their varied 
/ interests. You will like our warm spirit of helpfulness. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




National Bank of Commerce 

OF HOUSTON 



"THE BANK OF COURTESY »» 



Compliments of 

LUNDBLAD BROTHERS 



GIFTS — HARDWARE 



Georgetown 



Texas 



FOR SERVICE WITH THAT EXTRA 
SOMETHING, JUST CALL 

MILES BROS. 

Cleaners & Dyers 

Serving Georgetown and Southwestern 
for Over A Quarter of A Century 



804 AUSTIN AVE. 



PHONE 60 





Herb and Melanie shuffle through 
registration cards. 



Musch and White paint up the Kappa 
Sig house. 



CATES PRINT SHOP 

Specialty in Students' Stationery 

For Quality Printing 

ENGRAVING — EMBOSSING 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 

Georgetown 



onc^ino 

PRODUCE COMPANY 

Telephone 655 




HUMBLE 



The Humble Company 

its 19,000 employees, and the 8,000 driveway salesmen 
who supply you with Humble products, extend to the 

. . . Class of 1950 



their hearty congratulations and best wishes. 




Washing 
Good Gulf Gas 




Lubrication 
No Nox Gas 



RAYMOND LINDELL 

GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 
Phone 420 



Gulf Pride Oil 



Seat Covers 



HUEY & PHILP HDWE. CO. 

Manufacturers and Jobbers 



Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional 
Equipment and Supplies 



Dallas 



Houston 



Fort Worth 





"THE SIGN OF GOOD CLOTHES" 




rmwm,,, f 



Workmen speedily putting up the stone 
sidings to the new chapel. 



Compliments 
of 

L. L. Sams & Son 

CHURCH FURNITURE 
Waco, Texas 




Karl Piehl 



Phone 478 



Georgetown Appliance Co. 

REFRIGERATION AND APPLIANCES 
"We Service Everything We Sell" 
Frigidaire Products 



CUNNINGHAM DRUG 

Across From Hospital 

GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 
Phone 675 




"He doesn't belong to me, he just 
follows me around." 




Gugenheim-Goldsmith 
Company 

Wholesale Fruits and Produce 




AUSTIN, TEXAS 

410 East 3rd St. L. D. 28